In one of those all-too-common cases of outrage getting halfway around the world before shut-the-fuck-up has put its pants on, the blogosphere is angry at Amazon. Again.

The book giant’s latest crime? Charging self-published authors “gigantic” fees for delivering ebooks to buyers. Or as the Next Web puts it: “As it turns out, [Amazon’s] 70% [royalty] rate doesn’t include delivery costs, which can be high. That means that the total percentage that an author receives for their book can be far, far lower than the stated rate.”

As evidence, they cite the case of author Andrew Hyde, whose $9.99 ebook (an 18.5MB file) was hit with over $2.50 in additional fees for delivery to Kindle users: far more than Hyde was charged for delivering the same book to Nook and iPad users. “Outrage!” cried Hyde. “Scandal!” cried The Next Web. “For the love of God,” wept I.

I’ve published more than my fair share of books on Amazon, so I know about Amazon’s $0.15/MB data charges all too well. That’s how much extra — on top of the company’s standard cut of every sale — you have to pay Amazon for delivering your book over their Whispernet wireless network. On a 18.5MB book, that’s around $2.77. Which is a lot. But here’s the twist: Amazon spells out those charges when you upload your book. It tells you precisely how much it’s going to charge you and why.

Unlike the Nook and the iPad, Amazon’s Kindle comes with free, built in global 3G wifi for the end user. As this XKCD cartoon points out, that’s pretty magical. It’s also expensive. And so to recoup some of the millions of dollars that Amazon has to pay its third party 3G carriers, it passes the cost of delivering books on to the publisher.

In the case of a normal size book with one or two images, the delivery cost is less than $0.50. That’s a mere pittance if only for the fact that Amazon has built the world’s largest network of permanently connected ereaders, making your self-published book instantly available to the whole fucking planet. An 18.5MB Kindle book packed with pictures is expensive to send. It’s also entirely your choice whether to do so. There’s always the iPad or the Nook if you want to reduce costs.

It’s constantly surprising how constantly surprised people are to learn that Amazon is a business. A public company no less. And as such, it is not just entitled, but obliged, to make a profit for making books more accessible than they’ve been since the beginning of time. Furthermore, it is not unreasonable for that same company to charge the same data transfer rates as your cellphone carrier would to deliver a product for which you can name your own price, at a royalty higher than that offered by even the most generous traditional publisher, to customers around the globe.

What is outrageous, however, is the entitlement of self-publishing authors (and scandal-hungry bloggers) who cry foul at the idea of anyone having to pay the price of admission to Amazon’s publishing revolution.