A few months ago, Snip.it opened the doors after sitting in a private beta mode for the better part of the past year. Now Snip.it is announcing a major redesign overhaul of the social sharing service, including a mobile platform. It’s a speedy, JavaScript-based design built on open source Backbone.js, making for quick updates and transitions between content. They redesigned the entire site around feedback from users over the past few months.

Snip.it has also grown. Within the months of pulling back the curtains from private beta, the site went from just a few hundred users in October to 13,000 active Snippers. That growth was purely organic.

But Snip.it is just another Pinterest “me too,” right? Hush, not exactly. At least not with its intended aim, and this update should show a much greater distinction in how users will interact. The initial idea was conceived by Ramy Adeeb during the Arab Spring uprising last year. Ramy, who was a principal at Khosla Ventures and earlier held the post of Senior Manager of Enterprise Engineering at TellMe, took up Tweeting information and his opinions on what was happening within the uprising. But he soon realized that his Twitter followers knew him for – and were only interested in content from – his experience in tech and Silicon Valley, not personal commentary on social strife halfway around the world.

So Ramy decided to “take a step back.” While Yahoo started out with categorizing content, its efforts were replaced by Google’s search bar, which helped find content. But because Google lists content by predetermined factors and popularity, it killed the act of “discovery” says Ramy. Then Facebook stepped up and allowed users to share their interests among their social grasp. Although Twitter users follow people based on their primary interest, it’s not suited for users with a multitude of interests. Not to mention, after just three to four minutes, your content disappears into the void. None of this seemed suitable to Ramy.

Pinterest was a candidate to take on multi-interest users, but it’s strictly tailored for visuals. Ramy says it’s for “eye candy,” and that there’s no site out there for sharing “brain candy”.

So began Snip.it, a site where users follow by interest and topic, not according to fellow users. Where most may have five to 10 collections, the serious users may only be truly prolific in four or five of their feeds. It’s this subdivision of topical content that Ramy believes will drive people to find and share top quality “Snips”. Not to mention the ability for users to view their own personalized analytics to find out who’s following their content, and what they prefer. Snip.it is also developing a recommendation engine tailored to their most random interests, and their best collections.

Ramy hopes to create a site where the users dredging up obscure long-tail content from around the Intertubes can rise to the top because of their individuality, and without compromising an audience that follows their other collections of content. The site aims to grow and become a human-powered content aggregation discoverable, communicative, and expressive of real interests.