Being able to control a computer screen with your finger is no longer just a mediocre superpower. Its what over 26,000 developers are dying to be a part of.

Today, the San Francisco based Leap Motion is releasing its developer application numbers to the world. They have “developers in 143 countries and all 50 US states,” the company says, and the variety doesn’t stop there. CEO Michael Buckwald is impressed by the the sheer diversity of applications. They have an astounding range of “use ideas from developers [including] translating sign language, driving a car or airplane, supporting physical rehabilitation and special needs, manipulating photos and videos, and creating new art forms and thousands more,” says the company.

The technology’s potential is endless, and the company is looking for the highest quality developers to fulfill that potential. Leap Motion has been very selective in choosing people building applications “true to to the spirit of what [they're] trying to do,” says Buckwald. The company would pick quality over quantity any day (although that doesn’t mean applications aren’t rolling in with quantity).

With each new application, it’s amazing to see them move from “emulating the touch screen” into “trying to take advantage of 10-finger interaction as well as the three dimensional nature of the device tracking,” says Buckwald. For consumers it will be a refreshing change of pace, using a new product built to work in the same way we interact with the real world.

“We have always been very clear that we are not trying to build technology that seems cool, we are trying to build technology that is a better way of using a computer,” says Buckwald.

n a field dominated by software, this hardware company is looking to create true innovation, which gives them a far better chance of changing the world than the next “hot an flashy social network for my cats pajamas*.” Unfortunately, this cutting-edge 3D motion-control technology will not be shipping to us non-developers until February 2013.

“Applications poured in at an average rate of 1.55 every minute” their first week of accepting applications for their free software development units, and by the end of the week they had received 15,000, says the company. To put this number into perspective, Buckwald estimates that “there are about 400,000 iPhone developers right now,” which is a product that has been around since 2007.

With the “tremendous excitement to build for a platform that has 100th mm tracking…that is extremely small…that has a lot of enthusiasm” Buckwald predicts that the rate Leap Motion is accumulating new applications does not look like it’s going to slow down any time soon.

*This is not a real social network, although it’d be interesting if it was.

[Image courtesy of Leap Motion]