Peter Thiel is proof that chess concepts can be highly valuable in the entrepreneurial world. He has attributed his success to what he learned playing the game, and ultimately becoming a FIDE rated Chess Master.

Another rising star in Silicon Valley, Axcient CEO Justin Moore, was one of the top-20 ranked US chess players in the under-18 bracket as a 12-year-old. Now at age 31, he heads up the seventh fastest growing company in Silicon Valley, according to Inc Magazine.

So it’s no surprise that the non-profit, America’s Foundation For Chess, is travelling across America with the No. 1 ranked chess player in the world, 21-year-old Magnus Carlsen, to get more kids interested in playing the game. The game has been statistically proven to enhance students’ interest and success in science, math, and technology.

In the current school year, nearly 50,000 second and third graders in 27 states across the country will participate in the First Move program. The goal is to have 1,200 new classrooms add chess to the curriculum.

The group made a stop at Silicon Valley Bank where Managing Partner Aaron Gershenberg had the opportunity to talk with Carlsen about what chess has taught him.

[Image courtesy loco]