tracks insideSo, Windows 8… Though its release has left a mark on Microsoft, what with Steven Sinofsky’s outing, slow sales of devices running the operating system, and some scathing reviews, some developers are still willing to give Windows a shot.

Tracks, a New York-based company working to create the “experience graph,” which is hard to type with a straight face, is one of them. The company, which has raised two rounds of funding totaling $1.4 million, has released a Windows 8 version of its app.

The service actually started as an iPhone-only network, but has since expanded to include this new Windows app, a Web product, and an Android app. Tracks CEO Vic Singh says that the company embraced the desktop because of its users, who said that they wanted their iPhone-less friends and family to be able to use the service.

Tracks allows users to create shared photo and video collections that can be edited by friends and, for public “tracks,” anyone using the service. Though this has been done before – lookin’ at you, pre-pivot Color, and Tapshare, and likely a half-dozen others – Tracks’ average 4.5 star rating for both iOS and Android apps suggest that its users are fond of the service.

At least part of this affection comes from Tracks’ design. Singh says that the company is careful to embrace all of the platform-specific guidelines it comes across, custom-tailoring its app for the Metro design language, Google’s Holo interface guidelines, or iOS’ look and feel as needed. The result is an app suite that doesn’t feel like its design was shoe-horned from iOS but is still recognizable based on its own branding decisions. (And, hey, these platforms are starting to look a bit more alike every day – Tracks’ multi-platform commitment might become even easier in the future.)

Now that Tracks has a foundation spread across the mobile and desktop ecosystems, the company plans on introducing new features in 2013. Singh wouldn’t mention what Tracks has planned beyond saying “It can be temporal, it can be interest-based, but as we look towards the future we want to look at other media types that turn a ‘track’ into another self-expression social network.”