spyingYesterday I wrote about the out of control number of tracking tools hidden behind every site on the web.

Tech publications seemed to be amongst the worst offenders with Re/Code tracking users in 33 — thirty three! — different ways.

Pando isn’t completely off the hook, though, with 15 different trackers. Obviously we need to be able to serve ads, and get some idea of who is on our site and for how long, but it seems to me that any more than three or four tracking tools is too many. I’m working with our tech team to get the current number way down.

I ended yesterday’s post by noting that I hadn’t been able to find a single site that didn’t contain at least one piece of tracking code. Apparently the battle for privacy had been completely lost.

But no!

A few minutes ago, for an unrelated story, I went over to PACER.gov — the US Government site that gives access to public court records. I waited for Ghostery to open its usual list of detected tracking tools…

…and I waited…

…but nothing happened. In fact, PACER.gov doesn’t appear to contain any tracking tools at all.

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Given how much we now know about illegal US government spying, it’s somewhat ironic that apparently the only site not spying on us is the one managed by the administrative office of the US Courts.