dvorkinLewis Dvorkin — aka the man who ruthlessly trimmed all the of the gravitas from Forbes and finally gave advertisers the respect they pay for — wants to reassure concerned PR people readers that nothing will change, despite the company’s sale to Hong Kong.

Writing on, obviously, Forbes, Dvorkin explains how the sale won’t divert him from a strategy which has turned one of the world’s most respected business publications into an obligatory eye-roll on every social media consultant’s resume…

We’re focused on launching innovative products and crafting a content strategy for the fast-moving era of social media.

We’ve already done a lot. We launched a first-of-its-kind digital contributor network, now 1,400 strong. We transformed a Web site into a publishing platform, with an audience approaching 30 million (as measured by comScore) that finds us relevant to their lives. We developed technology to power the platform that we’re licensing to others. We put in place a people-centric magazine cover strategy that spurred a 20% rise in readership, t0 6.1 million (according to MRI). We paved the way in native advertising, with 50 marketers creating content on Forbes.com. We convened our followers — the powerful, the influential, the up-and-comers — for summits on philanthropy, healthcare, women and domestic and international business topics.

It’s been exciting, and there’s more to come…

Oh goody! Like what?

In October, we’ll introduce a new home page for marketers (and editorial contributors, too). Parts of it will resemble the ForbeLife home page above. Since November 2010, BV partners have used the same tools as staffers and contributors to publish on Forbes.com. Soon, they’ll have access to more tools so they can program the look and feel of their home page and include native and social content they’ve published elsewhere on the Web….

Ok, I can’t read any more. Keep doing your crazy thing, Lewis.