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    RIP SF Bay Guardian: Activist journalism no longer worth its weight in wood pulp

    It’s a sad day for “the real” San Francisco. Today, sidewalk boxes will fill up with the latest and last edition of The San Francisco Bay Guardian, the progressive weekly rag that’s been a fixture in the city for just shy of half a century. The Guardian’s publisher, the San Francisco Media Company, made the announcement yesterday, freezing the paper’s online version and laying off all staff, effective immediately. In the end it wasn’t any sexy defamation or obscenity…
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    What ever happened to Google’s lease for a huge government airfield in Mountain View?

    In our age of lightspeed speculation over the intentions of a handful of powerful Silicon Valley executives, you’d think there would be more buzz about the deal in the works between Google and NASA to bestow upon Google the rights to a massive government airport adjacent to NASA’s Ames Research Center and a stone’s throw from the Googleplex. In February it was announced that the federal General Services Administration had selected a bid by Google subsidiary Planetary Ventures to lease…
  • open_internet

    The EFF’s annual awards highlight an ongoing blindspot in its struggle for a free and open Internet

    Last night in the upper Lodge theater of San Francisco’s Regency Center, the Electronic Frontier Foundation hosted its 23rd annual Pioneer Awards. By some strange quirk of the cosmos, there was a scraggly line of next-generation hippie dreamers selling crystals and wielding fierce dogs outside, because the eminent Grateful Dead cover band the Dark Star Orchestra was playing the Regency’s main ballroom at the same time. The EFF, of course, was co-founded by Grateful Dead lyricist and collaborator John Perry…
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    20 years on, a Star Trek writer on how his vision of a tech-ruined San Francisco is panning out

    In 1994, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine showrunner and executive producer Ira Steven Behr had a profound experience along the Santa Monica boardwalk. The weather was beautiful, and daytrippers and tourists were frolicking and taking pictures. There was also a sizeable homeless contingent sprawled about the scenic coastline, and it was the interaction between these groups that struck Behr, and prompted him to write the “Past Tense” episodes of DS9, first broadcast in 1995. “People were just ignoring them completely……
  • spieslikeus10124

    True to form, the Canadians are politely spying on Silicon Valley

    Rocketspace is a co-working whatchamacallit occupying 70,000 square feet (and counting) spread between two iconic buildings in the bank-clad canyons of Sansome and Bush Streets in San Francisco’s Financial District. As such, it’s an unlikely headquarters for an international spy ring. Perhaps that’s the point. Back in June, I went to Rocketspace to meet with Canada’s Consul General for San Francisco, Cassie Doyle, and Senior Trade Commissioner, John Zimmerman. For the past three years Canada has been using Rocketspace…
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    “Yo, have you heard of Silicon Valley?” Ben Horowitz hosts Nas in Redwood City

    Hip hop was born sometime in the 70’s, probably in New York, and grew up over the course of block parties in that city’s toughest neighborhoods. Last night, it was presented to a seated crowd at the Fox Theater in Redwood City, at an event hosted by venture firm Andreessen Horowitz*. The occasion featured a private screening of a new documentary about the rapper Nas, Time is Illmatic. Nas was on stage along with Andreessen Horowitz partner Ben Horowitz.…
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    A look back at the first issues of Wired prompts the question: How far have we come?

    As a newcomer to the field of digital journalism, I decided a few months back to get myself grounded in the form by ordering the first three issues of Wired, from way back in 1993. The magazines are portal into a world that existed before the mass adoption of the internet, before Google, Yahoo!, Netscape, the iPod, Amazon, the smartphone and Mark Zuckerberg’s first zit. It was an age when advertisers still tried to convince a rational reader with paragraphs-long…
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    Google lifts formerly controversial name restrictions on formerly significant social network

    This afternoon Google has bowed to public pressure and…eliminated its names restrictions for Google+! It’s not the most interesting possible sentence to begin that way, by a long shot. And many tech sites are underwhelmed by the breakthrough. For the last three years, Google has required a verified real name for users of Google+. The policy was the subject of some controversy when Google+ first debuted in 2011. It aroused anger from users who had their…
  • Space_Needle002

    Victory for Lyft and Uber in Seattle council vote

    After 15 months of continuous negotiations, Lyft and Uber will be able to operate (fairly) freely again in Seattle. An earlier attempt to regulate the growing ridesharing market there had capped the number of cars in service at 150 per company. Today’s hearing before the Seattle City Council was delayed several times when lawmakers asked for clarification as to what exactly they were voting on. The measure at stake included a raft of amendments, and amendments to amendments, regarding considerations…
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    Sean Parker gives $49k to make life easier for other San Francisco parkers

    Sean Parker, he of Napster, Facebook, Timberlake, and $4.5 million wedding ceremony fame, has donated $49,000 to back a voter initiative to give more of a voice to San Francisco motorists. The bill, which will appear on the San Francisco ballot in November, bears the vague title “Restore Transportation Balance”.  As reported by the San Francisco Chronicle, it includes provisions increasing the availability of parking, the limiting of parking fees and meters and the amounts of parking tickets, and…

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