• browser_FEATURE

    Why do mobile browsers suck so bad?

    In the debate over whether our mobile computing experience should be dominated by native apps or the mobile Web, one side has always had an unfair advantage. Since the iPhone was launched in 2007 until now, native apps have worked better, looked better, and been far more abundant than their Web counterparts – and neither Apple, with iOS, nor Google, with Android, have done anything to change the status quo. But it’s really no wonder that the mobile Web hasn’t been…
  • whatsapp_windows_phone_7

    Is WhatsApp the new MySpace?

    The last year has been very active for WhatsApp. The world’s leading messaging app has continued to see explosive growth, and is now seeing 400 million active monthly users – an important metric that shows people are not only downloading the service, but also actually using it. This dizzying milestone is the cap of a busy 12 months or so in which it was rumored to be the subject of big-money acquisitions by first Facebook and then Google,…
  • smartphone_china

    Report: Chinese developers massively outspend the US on mobile ads as they target emerging markets

    Chinese app developers are outspending US developers on mobile ads, and they appear to be aggressively targeting developing markets in Asia and the Middle East, according to a new report from AppFlood, a mobile ad network owned by China-based PapayaMobile. Over the six months between March and September 2013, Chinese developers increased their in-app mobile advertising on Android by 151 percent, ultimately surpassing the US, according to an analysis of AppFlood’s traffic. China accounted for 38 percent of all…
  • Face++

    Face++ shows more evidence of innovation from China (aside from that moon landing)

    If you’re ever looking for evidence of Chinese startups being able to innovate at the same pace as their US counterparts – apart from, you know, the country’s recent successful soft moon landing – you could do worse than check out Face++, a Beijing-based facial recognition company that appears to making a push for attention in the West. By the same token, if you’re ever looking for evidence that the future is going to be freaky, you could do…
  • ipad Library

    Meet the latest subscription ebooks service: Entitle

    First we had Oyster, then Scribd got into it, and now the US has another subscription ebooks service: Entitle. Entitle launches today after a four-month beta period under what is one of the worst imaginable names for such a service: eReatah. Like Oyster and Scribd, the service asks users to pay a set monthly fee to get access to a certain number of ebooks. Unlike its competitors, however, Entitle lets subscribers own the books – so they can…
  • putman portrait_2

    Founders Fund pumps $7M into super-resolution startup that could combat cancer

    Matthew Putman has released two albums, authored a book of poems, produced off-Broadway plays, as well as a film, taught himself calculus by reading “Calculus for Dummies,” and survived cancer – twice. Now, the polymath scientist and entrepreneur has $7 million in funding from Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund for his startup Nanotronics Imaging, which makes a super-resolution desktop microscope and imaging software that can detect smaller-than-micron details in real-time. The technology may one day help prevent cancers from developing. Thiel, cofounder…
  • Jack-Ma

    There will be blood: WeChat’s payments prowess makes it a target for Alibaba

    While people in the US laugh at how ugly QR codes are, WeChat is using them as a killer payments tool. And it’s starting to scare the world’s biggest ecommerce player: Alibaba. China’s leading mobile chat app, which is owned by Tencent, is emerging as a force in electronic payments, with the humble QR code serving as the chief form of transport for financial transactions and discount redemption through the platform. In response, Alibaba, which owns the PayPal-like…
  • privacy-flickr

    Anti-surveillance petition out-does the Death Star. White House must now respond

    A couple of days ago, it looked like Mark Stanley’s “We The People” petition asking for reform of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act would fall well short of the 100,000 signatures needed to trigger a White House response. Despite a bipartisan “Day of Action” last week led by the Center for Democracy and Technology, where Stanley is campaign and communications strategist, the petition had only 60,000 signatures on it with just a couple of days remaining. That total would…
  • Platform

    Sorry, Instagram: Kik, now at 100M users, shows how a platform trumps messaging

    A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post arguing that Kik, a mobile browser disguised as a chat app, is the dark horse of the Internet. Now, some updates from the Waterloo, Ontario-based company: Kik has now passed 100 million registered users. Kik “cards” – which are HTML5 Web apps, like the game “Costume Party” and Zynga’s “1 Word” – have been visited installed 145 million times. There are so far only 32 such cards in existence.…
  • New Waywire

    Waywire’s new face looks a lot more like Robert Scoble than Cory Booker

    Remember Waywire? The video curation startup “founded” by Cory Booker, who only ever seemed to have a figurehead-type role with the company, had a quiet, face-saving exit in October, when it sold to enterprise video firm Magnify for an undisclosed sum. It had raised $1.75 million in seed money, and its investors included Oprah Winfrey, LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, and Lady Gaga’s manager Troy Carter. Waywire, which always seemed confused about its identity – was it a…

More articles »