Culture

  • don_draper

    The rise of “bro social” — Dudes are reluctantly sharing more

    The myth that men don’t share on social media may be changing. Anecdotally, at least, “bro social” is the latest rising tide in social traffic, according to Ricky Van Veen, co-founder of College Humor, Ben Lerer, CEO of Thrillist Media Group, and Allen DeBevoise, CEO (soon-to-be former) of Machinima, who spoke on a panel at the Business Insider Ignition conference today in New York. Social media networks trafficking in content sharing have long been dominated by women. The
  • hans-tung_09AAA

    Big-shot Chinese VC: “Tencent will surpass Facebook within 5 years”

    2013 has been an extraordinary year for Chinese Internet companies. In the last 12 months, they have become more international, taken on a bit of a star gloss, and re-found their footing on the US public markets. If you believe one of China’s leading venture capitalists, however, 2013 is just going to be the start of it. New GGV Capital partner Hans Tung says that within the next three to five years, Tencent will overtake Facebook in…
  • Aeon Film

    Slow Media leader Aeon launches new site for short films

    Two months ago, Aeon Magazine had its first birthday and I pointed to it and said it was my favorite magazine on the Internet. It is one of the best examples of “slow media” on the Web. By publishing just one longform story or essay a day under one of its six categories – which include “Being Human,” “Nature & Cosmos,” and “Altered States” – it resists the fast-twitch Twitterized culture of news in which pageview-obsessed publications…
  • Old apple

    Competition seeking tech ideas to improve public services could use some help of its own

    Last month, online engagement platform MindMixer and Code For America ran a competition “Ideation Nation,” seeking ideas from the American public for how to use technology to improve their communities. Good. After all, we can all agree it’s a smart idea for governments to become more innovative, right? A panel of judges is in the process of reviewing the ideas and on Monday will announce 25 finalists. Those ideas will then go back to the Ideation…
  • Tacos

    Tequila and Tacos: How this former Valley exec is poaching US talent for his Mexican startup lab

    It’s easy to get burnt out on the constant hustle of Silicon Valley. For Andy Kieffer, reaching for the pressure release valve after selling his Kleiner Perkins-backed startup in 2008 meant getting out of dodge. Despite having a young family, he didn’t move to Portland, San Diego, or Denver. Instead he packed up his life and moved 1,900 miles south to Guadalajara, Mexico. There he formed an incubator and contract dev shop called Agave Lab, hired some of…
  • NSABadge

    NSA chief: “If we can come up with a better way of doing these programs, we should”

    On Thursday night, at the end of a week packed with NSA drama that included revelations of MUSCULAR, the debut of a first surveillance “reform” bill, and a letter to Congress from tech leaders calling for more checks on spying, NSA director General Keith Alexander spoke to a friendly audience in Baltimore and asked for suggestions on how to better do his job. Alexander peppered his Halloween address to the Baltimore Council of Foreign Affairs with jokes…
  • liberte-egalite-fraternite-la-france

    Reddit is becoming its own worst enemy

    This week, the moderators of the subreddit r/Politics announced they would blacklist certain news organizations “to reduce the number of blogspam submissions and sensationalist titles.” The list includes Gawker (which has been banned on Reddit for more than a year), Salon, the Huffington Post, Policy Mic, Fox News, Mother Jones, Media Matters, The Onion, the Borowitz Report, and, amazingly, Reddit (yes, Reddit banned itself). What do they all have in common? According to r/Politics, they are either “blogspam,” “sensationalism,” or…
  • NSA_smiley

    It’s time for Silicon Valley to ask: Is it worth it?

    A hand-drawn emoticon ought to be enough to push Silicon Valley over the edge. The goading smiley-face sketch on a leaked NSA slide that pinpointed a weakness in the connection points of Google’s and Yahoo’s data centers was published in yesterday’s Washington Post alongside revelations that the spy agency has been doing more than just demanding that tech companies hand over personal data so it can monitor foreign suspects. It has also been going behind their backs to take…
  • chinese_american_money

    The Chinese are coming: Rumored Tencent investment in Snapchat highlights growing Sino tech influence

    Tencent, China’s largest Internet company, is the focus of speculation that Snapchat is raising a round of funding that would value it at $3.5 billion. If Tencent does prove to be the big-money backer behind the surprise funding round, it would be further evidence of China’s largest Internet companies, led by Tencent, taking on an expansionist role by investing in US startups. AllThingsD reported the rumor on Friday, claiming that the lead investor “might be a strategic party from Asia,”…
  • Glenn Greenwald

    Is Glenn Greenwald the future of news? Yes. And no.

    If you had to choose between Bill Keller and Glenn Greenwald as your arbiter of all the news that’s fit to squabble over, whom would you pick? In one corner, we have Keller, former executive editor of the New York Times and now an op-ed writer for the paper, who believes that reporters should strive for impartiality and bemoans the encroachment of opinion into news reports. He holds that position, apparently, despite reports that Times media reporter David Carr…
  • OmidyarAAA

    Pierre Omidyar’s news is old news

    We’re starting to get some details about the new media venture into which eBay founder Pierre Omidyar is plowing $250 million and retaining the services of Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, and Jeremy Scahill. The New York Times’ David Carr has followed up Jay Rosen’s interview with the media’s new favorite billionaire with a Q&A and a column that notes the wave of tech rich guys who have a sudden interest in owning news organizations. The most salient…
  • MapPins

    Kai-fu Lee’s Innovation Works plots a course in the US

    There appears to be a boutique industry developing around companies wanting to help US startups get set up in China. InnoSpring, the first US-China tech incubator, has been at it for a year and a half. Yodo1 is a studio that helps Western gaming companies adapt their products for the China market. In hardware, Boston-based Dragon Innovation and Shenzhen-based Haxlr8r provide deep ties to Chinese manufacturing and supply chain partners. And China’s largest Internet company, Tencent,…
  • shutterstock_1854318

    Startup bureaucracy: Can government reinvent itself as an innovative force?

    The day of the government shutdown, which came as a result of House Republicans’ stand against Obamacare, the government’s brand new $600 million Healthcare.gov website crashed right on launch. Instead of accessing the new healthcare exchanges and information, visitors were put in an eternal online waiting room. It is likely the most expensive 404 the world has ever seen. Considered as a pair, the events seemed a pat metaphor for the cruel irony of the political standoff. As Wonkblog’s…
  • Working hard or hardly working? Inside the ultimate man cave at Thrillist

    Every morning Ben Lerer starts his day by walking through a sea of balloons and grabbing a beer from his assistant… apparently. Welcome to the triumphant return of Office Crashers with our inside peak at the ultimate man cave: Thrillist’s New York HQ. In this video, co-founders Lerer and Adam Rich tell us about how their little corner of SoHo went from all OBGYNs to all startups in a matter of a few years. There’s a rug with a dude’s…
  • twitter_feature

    Twitter’s female “problem” — This is why mobs don’t appoint public company boards

    I can’t believe this debate about whether Twitter is an awful company, simply because everyone on its board has a Y-chromosome, is still going on. Memo to the press: It’s no longer August. It’s not particularly a slow news month. There are so many interesting conversations to be having about Twitter’s impending IPO. Really, a three-day freak out about no women being on the board is one of them? It’s not like there are 40 people on said board. It’s…
  • WeChat

    The new Facebook lives in China

    We’ve said it before, but because we’re just wrapping up a special report about mobile chat, it’s worth saying again. WeChat is, like, the biggest thing ever. China’s leading mobile chat app, a product of Tencent, the country’s largest Internet company and one of the top five in the world by market cap, has achieved virtual ubiquity in the Middle Kingdom, taking up residence on the handsets of the young and old. It enjoys the sort of dominance…

The Week in Review