internet of things

  • nest_moving

    While Nest and Google are popping champagne, plenty of others should be concerned

    In case you were hiding under a rock today, Google acquired smart home thermostat and smoke detector company Nest for $3.2 billion. It’s an unexpected move that has shocked plenty in Silicon Valley, igniting debate about the range of implications — for the hardware sector, user privacy, competitors including Apple, and Nest investors. When Google enters an industry it goes big, but it rarely asks permission, and in the process regularly tramples competitors and users’ privacy. The…
  • staples_iPhone_hub_2blurred

    Staples Connect offers consumers a taste of their connected futures

    Shopping for connected devices seems a lot like shopping for drugs. Finding someone willing to sell them to you is difficult. New buyers might not know what they’re looking for, and the chance of experiencing some form of buyer’s remorse the next morning is high. (Or so the latest “Grand Theft Auto” has taught me, anyway.) Staples today announced the Staples Connect project to offer buyers a taste (of the connected products, of course, not the illicit substances) in its…
  • IFTTT for iPhone 01

    IFTTT and SmartThings partner to make the Internet of Things easier to manage

    Bridging the gap between the digital and physical worlds just became a whole lot easier. IFTTT and SmartThings have announced a partnership  through which people who use both products will be able to “seamlessly integrate all types of innovative sensors and devices with your favorite online services.” The only surprising aspect of this alliance is that it took so goddamn long to be formed. The services have long complemented each other, with one (IFTTT) promising to make it…
  • hermitcrab

    Do connected devices make sense if you don’t own your own home?

    Renting is ephemeral by default. You move in. You move out. Someone else takes your place. This encourages landlords to restrict what you can do with the property, whether it’s by enforcing a rule against poking holes in the walls or by making sure that no-one in the building has access to a thermostat. It’s their property, you’re just living in it. This makes it difficult to embrace many of the products meant to connect everyday objects to the Internet.…
  • Slide4[1]

    The hardware revolution is upon us and why it matters

    Almost exactly six years ago, Apple launched the first iPhone. It was a small device that many dismissed as a toy. In reality Steve put a supercomputer in our pocket — we just didn’t know it. And like super computers before, it came with immense capabilities and brought about an opportunity to rethink, reimagine and reinvent how we live, work, create and consume. Today, smartphones sell by the hundreds of millions, and with that they bring what Chris Anderson (True Founder,…
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    The street in Provo that’s home to three billion-dollar tech companies

    Last year was a pretty decent time to be a tech business in Provo’s Riverwoods Business Park. May 15: Qualtrics, an online surveys company that has been profitable since 2002, raises $70 million in a growth round from Accel Partners and Sequioa Capital. The round puts Qualtrics’ valuation at north of $1 billion. September 18: Home automation company Vivint is acquired by Blackstone for $2 billion. October 22: Genealogy giant Ancestry.com gets picked up by European private equity firm Permira…

  • duncecap

    Let’s kill the word “smart”

    By now you’d think manufacturers would’ve grown tired of calling everything “smart.” There are smart watches, smart locks, smart televisions, smartphones, smart refrigerators, smart boards, smart cards, smart cars, smart lightbulbs, and even a “smart dildo” (which is really just an Android app — insert your joke here). At this rate Pillsbury will soon be releasing smart brownie batter meant to be mixed by Kitchen-Aid’s smart blender and baked by…
  • applefight

    Your music, everywhere: DoubleTwist launches MagicPlay to dethrone Apple’s AirPlay

    There’s almost no reason to buy an Apple TV. The set-top box doesn’t support as many services as other devices, comes with the world’s worst remote, and costs more than competitive products. Its only redeeming quality is its ability to stream songs, videos, and games via AirPlay, a proprietary protocol that allows iOS and Mac users to push content to other devices over a WiFi network. And even that isn’t perfect, as manufacturers must pay a licensing fee to…
  • power_outlet

    Plug ‘em in: Let’s make electrical outlets a little smarter

    Electrical outlets are practically begging to be forgotten. They’re often discreetly tucked into corners, hidden behind furniture, or buried beneath a tangle of cords few dare to touch. They’re commodities that, like so many other objects deserving of that title, are only remembered when they aren’t around — otherwise they simply accept your laptop chargers and television cords and air fresheners before disappearing once again. Modern life would be a whole lot dumber without these basic outlets, but the objects…
  • zonoff_home_left

    Embrace the incumbents: Zonoff wants to help large companies break into the Internet of Things

    There is no shortage of startups hoping to unify all of the connected devices trying to enter your home. There’s SmartThings, which raised over $1 million on Kickstarter for its connected device hub; Spark Devices, which graduated from the HXLR8R program with plans to introduce micro-chips and cloud services for hardware makers; Berg, which is trying to encourage active sharing between connected devices and the companies that make them with the Berg Cloud Sandbox; and Ninja…
  • Nestimage

    The Internet of the Mundane: Smart locks, connected lightbulbs, and learning thermostats

    Your locks are probably the most boring piece of technology in your home. They aren’t connected to the Internet; they don’t tweet; and you can’t play “Angry Birds” on ‘em, unless you count the squawking of your horrible neighbor-ladies as they drunkenly insert the wrong key in the middle of the night (which I do). They’re often an afterthought that only get noticed when they stop working or force you to rummage for your keys while you’re rushing to get…
  • august

    Yves Behar on design and the Internet of Things

    Yves Behar is the high-profile designer behind products like the Jawbone Jambox and the Ouya gaming console. Yesterday, he unveiled his new project, August, at the D11 conference to much fanfare – a “smart lock” that lets a you lock and unlock a door with your smartphone.  Like other Behar designs, the August is simple, effective, and easy-to-use. In addition to the lock not requiring keys, a user can control who can enter his home and keep a log of…
  • connected_feature

    Can connected devices change the world?

    There’s been plenty of talk about how connected devices can help each of us individually. Fitness trackers like the Fitbit Flex, Jawbone Up, and Nike+ FuelBand are meant to help you finally get in shape. Nest’s learning thermostat promises to lower your energy bill by up to 20 percent. A connected home might be able to tell you when the laundry is done, can lock the doors and turn off the lights when you go to sleep, or…
  • twitter_worth

    Is the Internet of Things the future of narcissism?

    I’m surprised that Time didn’t force the selfie-taking millennial on its cover about the “ME ME ME” generation to wear a fitness tracker, the new epitome of data-driven narcissism. The Web has made it easy to quantify attention, whether it’s measured by pageviews, endorsements, or interactions. Now the Internet of Things is making it easy to quantify the social value of the physical world in like manner. We have fitness trackers and motion sensors, devices like Scanadu’s Scout, and smart…
  • Ninja Blocks cropped

    Enter the Ninja: A startup attempts world domination on “Internet of Things” from Australia

    You might have heard of Ninja Blocks. The Sydney-based startup first came to the world’s attention last year with one of the most successful pre-Pebble hardware campaigns on Kickstarter. The Ninja Block, a small device with built-in sensors that allowed users to link the Internet to actions in the physical world, raised more than $100,000 in pledges and shipped out to customers only a couple of months after deadline – almost unheard-of in the world of hardware projects on Kickstarter.…

  • horiz_vertical_wordless

    For the Internet of things, will it be verticals or horizontals?

    The first step in the adoption of “the Internet of things” – where Web capabilities are implemented into everyday objects – entails making sure there are even products in the first place. But as that ecosystem fills out, one of the next steps is addressing matters of market approach and distribution. During a panel discussion yesterday at a conference hosted by Techonomy, venture capitalists and executives mused about the model the Internet of things would take as the landscape takes…

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