Pando

August 2012

  1. At The Pool Wades Into the Waters of Consumer Web, Launches Mobile Site

    It's a chicken-egg problem for startups who take the DIY approach: How to demonstrate growth to investors while severely bootstrapped until funding comes through. Los Angeles-based At The Pool was approached by several local accelerators, but decided to go out on its own, two weeks ago launching a mashup of dating site Match.com with group networking portal Meetup. At The Pool released its mobile optimized site today.

    By Whitney Phaneuf , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Things Move Fast in Boulder: FullContact's Funding Round Streamlined by Foundry Group

    When we first announced the plan to travel around the country covering startups, a big motivation was to cover the companies that would be getting press if they were in Silicon Valley. Thousands of companies are routinely ignored, simply because they aren't near the press corps of New York or the Valley.

    By Trevor Gilbert , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Shiny Ads Joins PubMatic's Pool of Partners to Sling Premium Ads

    In the fight to move advertising dollars online, the last thing publishers can afford to do is leave available ad spending on the table. Unfortunately, a substantial percentage of available ad budgets are made up of small, often hyper-local buyers. There are so many of them that it doesn’t don’t make economic sense for publishers to sell to them individually.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Game On: Playing Our Way to a Better Taste Graph

    Why isn’t the social Web better at helping us find things we like, and find other people whose tastes we share? Why can’t Facebook or Tumblr understand that you specifically like roots rock, or down-tempo electronica, or small-budget foreign films, or non-superhero blockbusters, and make recommendations accordingly?

    By Marc Ruxin , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Look out Chrome, Chinese Browser Maxthon Wants the US Market

    You probably haven't heard of Chinese web browser Maxthon, but it rose up in China around the same time as Mozilla Firefox with a similar mission -- to take down Internet Explorer. A year ago, Maxthon opened an office in San Francisco and set its sights on growing its 130 million worldwide users in the US market, this week launching its first browser for Mac. If you believe there could be another browser war, a term that originated when Internet Explorer overtook Netscape, Maxthon is preparing to battle with soon-to-be dominant Chrome.

    By Whitney Phaneuf , written on

    From the News desk

  6. FounderDating Partners with Teach For America to Help EdTech Entrepreneurs Co-Founder Up

    FounderDating, the pre-eminent co-founder matchmaking service and entrepreneur networking platform, is moving beyond the generalities of a “technology” focus to announce its first sector specific vertical. The company has partnered with Teach For America’s Social Entrepreneurship Initiative in Launching FounderDating Education.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Eight Y Combinator Companies to Watch

    We're T minus three weeks until the country's most closely watched accelerator debuts its Summer 2012 class of companies. The classes at Y Combinator, compared with many other programs, are huge (this one is 82-strong) and the demo days are factory-like in their efficiency--witness Greg Kumparak's heroic liveblogging of the last one. The program isn't easy to get into, so all of Paul Graham's hand-picked companies are worth paying attention to... but just in case 82 feels a tiny bit overwhelming, we've highlighted eight of our favorites below.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  8. What Silicon Valley Can Do To Save Us All

    A day after reading Bill McKibben’s Rolling Stone article on “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math,” I was talking to a friend from Microsoft Shanghai about how screwed our planet is. The odds are woefully stacked against us, I said. My friend was more optimistic. Technology is evolving at such a clip and the financial incentives are so high, he argued, that we will innovate our way out of the problem.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

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