Pando

October 2012

  1. 500 Startups' latest batch of companies is so international we had to map it out

    500 Startups, Dave McClure's seed fund and startup accelerator, announced today that it's added 33 more companies to its portfolio. The new startups range from a tea marketplace based in Honolulu to a Web resource for repair shops based out of Estonia and Latvia.

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Blogger given top job at a national newspaper – a world first?

    This week in “News from New Zealand that's so crazy that you have to look,” a shit-stirring conservative blogger has been appointed editor of a national newspaper. As far as I can tell, it’s the world’s first case of a blogger taking over the top job at a newspaper.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Moveline raises $1.5 million to deal with moving companies (so you never have to)

    When Moveline moved into TechStars New York, the company -- started as a side project within an agency in Virginia -- had a totally different plan to disrupt the moving industry. The company had created a marketplace of moving companies, which was okay, but nothing special.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Sokanu is the career guidance counselor for the 21st century

    There’s a dramatic difference between a job worked to pay the bills, and a career which is fulfilling on a deeper level. Sadly, the majority of people never find their answer the fundamental question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Without this answer, few find true career satisfaction, and instead work in jobs that are ill-suited to their personal interests, values, strengths, and goals.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  5. "When your website goes down, it forces you to put your money where your mouth was" -- Buzzfeed's Ben Smith on last night's outage

    Just before 7pm Eastern last night, editor-in-chief Ben Smith noticed that one section of Buzzfeed.com was getting a lot more traffic than usual: the error page. Something was clearly wrong, so he messaged Mark Wilkie, Buzzfeed's Director of Technology. A few minutes later, Buzzfeed's staff had lost access to the entire back end of the site. They finally learned the reason for the outage, when a text arrived from an official at the datacenter housing Buzzfeed's servers:

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Meet the man behind "Is Twitter Wrong?" who helped debunk fake pictures during Hurricane Sandy

    Yesterday was a big day for citizen journalism. At one point during the storm users were posting 10 pictures to Instagram every second, and check out this dizzying website that displays in real-time every photo uploaded to Twitter with the tag #Sandy. But it was also a day for citizen and professional trickery. Fake photos and news spread across Twitter and, in the case of the fake news item about the New York Stock Exchange flooding, infiltrated the mainstream media. Perhaps a spot about traders making money off of underwater mortgages, then literally going underwater themselves, was too good to pass up. Some were easy to spot, like this shot of the Statue of Liberty lifted from the film "The Day After Tomorrow." Others were harder. This picture of a flooded McDonald's, for instance, which was, in fact, a photo of an art installation.

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Drag, drop, and roll: Bootstrapped Beijing startup launches site for video playlists

    Just two days out of the digital womb, newcomer Frogo.tv is turning up the focus on full-screen video with a new website that features an endless flow of content, drag-and-drop playlists, and smartphones as remote controls.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Understanding the irrational voter

    Regardless of which side of the political divide you’re on, you probably look at the opposition with confusion and disbelief. For many, trying to decipher the choices people make when they seem to vote against their self interest is an exercise in frustration, but voters aren’t as confounding as they appear. In order to make sense of a seemingly irrational body politic, one need only ignore the rules of economics and apply the rules of fashion and branding.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

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