Pando

February 2013

  1. How one digital dad has adapted

    My father set sail for Baja California to escape the “rat race” in Southern California. His inbox was made of black metal -- messages appeared on “while you were out” pink notepads, and callers would rather hang up than speak to an automated answering machine.

    By Marco Greenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  2. PandoMonthly Los Angeles with NastyGal's Sophia Amoruso, the full interview

    The first month of 2013 PandoMonthly events is officially over. PandoDaily's Sarah Lacy interviewed Airbnb's Brian Chesky in San Francisco at the beginning of the month, Etsy's Chad Dickerson last week in New York, and NastyGal's Sophia Amoruso last night in Los Angeles.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Top Pinterest users pin from tablets, not phones or computers, so make sure your tablet site doesn't suck

    HelloSociety calls itself a "Pinterest agency." And while that may sound a little weird, like having a "Twitter coach," the company has something on its side that most of the other so-called social media mavens, ninjas, and gurus don't: data.

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  4. The Verge and The Huffington Post attempt the impossible: making comments smarter

    At the start of December, a reader of The Verge from Stamford, Connecticut, did something kind of dorky but also kind of awesome. Inspired by Nilay Patel’s video interview with Senator Al Franken, the reader, who goes by the username zahntron, took himself and a camera to the office of Congressman Jim Himes, a Democrat of Connecticut’s 4th District. Zahntron then interviewed the congressman about his views on tech issues, such as the Stop Online Piracy Act. “Nilay's interview with Al Franken really inspired me to reach out to my Congressman and find out where he stands on these issues,” zahntron would write on The Verge’s “Meta” forum, where he posted the resulting video. (Oh hey – looks like we just took turned the meta up to 11. Go wild, postmodernists.)

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Focus on the feature: How doing one thing well benefits Dropbox, App.net, and consumers

    People expect their devices to do certain things. A smartphone isn't complete without an email app, a Web browser, or any of the other software that makes a device a tool, a toy, and everything in between. These applications and services are standard on many devices, from cheap smartphones to high-end, flagship handsets and tablets. They are not a product unto themselves, they are a feature that makes the real product (the device) better.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  6. PandoHouse Rock: Copyright, explained

    Thanks to the Internet, social media, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), navigating copyright issues has never been harder. And the tragedy of Aaron Swartz underscores just how ill-equipped current laws are at addressing modern copyright issues. But before we can reform copyright law, it's important to understand it. In our latest song, we've broken it all down for you, from public domain to fair use to creative commons. That way, when you post something to the Web, you'll know your own rights, and the rights of others. (All videos are public domain except where noted).

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Sources: Ziff Davis is close to buying IGN

    It's no secret that News Corp. has been trying to sell gaming portal IGN for some time. It even floated an aspirational price to the Wall Street Journal: $100 million.

    By Sarah Lacy and Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Cheap smartphones are the Bonnie to prepaid plans' Clyde

    Bonnie and Clyde. Simon and Garfunkel. The Three Stooges. Each of these groups relied on every member to work. Bonnie without Clyde was just a waitress. Simon without Garfunkel is just Simon. And one Stooge is just a mentally ill person caught in an endless loop of pain and absurd situations. Nobody would find their story worth telling if it weren't for the other parts of the equation, the people who helped the groups become cultural touchstones.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

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