Pando

April 2013

  1. Gamedesk's "Classroom of the Future." Why is it so hard to reinvent K-12 education?

    If we've learned anything from this month's series on ed-tech it's that changing centuries-old education traditions takes more than a touchscreen and good intentions. For all the exciting innovations put forth by the ed-tech movement, there remain fundamental challenges, including how to properly motivate students, how to navigate the internal politics of school districts, and what to do when the technology crashes.

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Google Now on iOS is neither Google nor Now

    By now you've probably heard that Google has brought Google Now, its virtual assistant, to iOS. And it's true -- Google has brought Google Now's most-obvious feature, the information-packed Cards that tell users about the weather, traffic, flight information, and a whole slew of other categories, to the iPhone and iPad. But this isn't the Google Now that's been shipping on Android devices for the last year. It's a less-functional imitation of itself that, despite all that it offers, serves as yet another reminder of how difficult it is to develop comprehensive services on Apple's platform.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Meet TenOneTen, a delightfully nerdy new LA fund from Gil Elbaz and David Waxman

    As discussed last week, the cat is out of the bag in terms of the rise of the Los Angeles startup ecosystem. With it has come the arrival of a number of new early stage investment funds and investors looking to capitalize on the growth wave. Unlike many newcomers, however, the latest fund to formally announce its presence is not simply hopping on the bandwagon. Rather, TenOneTen Capital has deep LA roots and serious credibility among its founders.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Eucalyptus strengthens compatibility with AWS and eyes developers for traction

    It’s no secret that good developers are one of Silicon Valley’s most precious commodities. Eucalyptus Systems today releases a new version of its cloud-management product, and CEO Marten Mickos says a focus was making it particularly developer-centric, in line with the "lean startup" philosophy that champions speed and agility.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  5. How Sebastian Thrun plans to "fix computer science"

    We couldn't let our month on online education end without a sit down with Sebastian Thrun. While he hasn't had the billion dollar exits, Thrun is one of the only entrepreneurs today who could hold a candle to Elon Musk in the ballsy, futurist Renaissance man department. He helped invent Google's self driving car and Google glass, but left all that behind to focus on remaking the world of eduction, with his startup Udacity.

    By Sarah Lacy , written on

    From the News desk

  6. How anyone can be a sports announcer with YouCommentate

    I grew up in a family of football fans. How could you not be a football fan though, growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 90s with the five-time Super Bowl Champion 49ers and their high-scoring West Coast offense? It was an exciting time, and I feel fortunate that, as a kid, my dad turned down the announcer chatter and explain the action to me.

    By Kym McNicholas , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Samsung's Galaxy Tab 3: A tablet that can make phone calls, whether you like it or not

    Samsung today announced the Galaxy Tab 3, a 7-inch tablet with the ability to make phone calls. Cue accusations of Samsung "trolling" consumers, the click-clack of thousands of keyboards conveying the vitriol of face-palming techies, and, soon, the end of civilization as we know it. (Wait, sorry, I was thinking of Google Glass with that last one.)

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  8. ThredUp enters women’s fashion consignment with more inventory than all competitors combined

    Watch out ThreadFlip, Poshmark, and Tradesy there’s a new kid on the women’s clothing consignment block and she’s no wallflower. While ThredUp may be new to the women’s category, the company has already moved hundreds of thousands of gently used children’s clothing items from buyer to seller.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

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