Pando

May 2013

  1. One way to take a stand on carried interest: Give it away

    While the debate over carried interest continues to retrace old steps, one venture capital fund is taking a stand on the tax loophole it benefits from by simply giving its carried interest profits to charity.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  2. A robotic unicorn helps turn PikPok into a startup again

    While the world ooohs and aaahs at the $2.4 million a day that Finnish mobile game studio Supercell is now bringing in, it can be easy to overlook gaming contenders from other parts of the world. Take New Zealand's PikPok, for example. The Wellington-based studio is the maker of the Adult Swim game "Robot Unicorn Attack 2," an off-beat endless runner that is sitting at number two in the iTunes Charts for free apps, behind only Zynga's "Draw Something 2."

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Is pretty good really good enough for Facebook?

    A few short years ago, Facebook was on track for world domination. The social network was building an open graph that would create and then dominate a new Internet structured around social relationships. Google and others would be sidelined. Mark Zuckerberg was annointed “our new Caesar” (without our consent – typical for dictatorships).

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Facebook gives Wall Street what it wants with mobile. Doesn't make Facebook ads any less crappy

    Facebook has now been public for almost a year. In that time, the company has learned a few important lessons. Zuckerberg learned to sell himself, his vision, and his company. Gone are the days of "Our mission is not to become a public company," or the days of it not mattering that the company's CEO was awkward and a little antisocial.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Software rules the world, and the Valley still rules software

    The debate over whether Silicon Valley will continue to have a strangle-hold on high-growth tech startups is an endless one on the pages of this blog and nearly every tech publication around the world. It seems every city is trying to articulate a vision for why they can be the "next Silicon Valley." Meanwhile, almost all of the largest tech companies are still formed here.

    By Sarah Lacy , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Not-so-humblebrag: PandoDaily gets two Emmy nominations

    I couldn't agree more with Bryan Goldberg's post today about online video. Having been part of the team launching TechTicker at Yahoo Finance and TechCrunchTV, I have learned a lot of hard lessons on what works and what doesn't when it comes to online video. And as Bryan says: You can spend hundreds of thousands and still have something that looks terrible, makes no money, and no one watches. It's hard for video to look luxe, and frustratingly easy for it to look all cable access.

    By Sarah Lacy , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Four takeaways from the IDC's tablet market report

    The IDC has released its quarterly report on the global tablet market, quantifying the rise -- or fall -- of 7-and 10-inch devices around the world. Given how important tablets are becoming to mobile computing, the rate at which they are replacing desktop and laptop PCs, and all the hullabaloo around graphs and charts and what-have-you, I figured it'd be good to gather four key takeaways (with charts!) and present 'em to you, Cliff Notes style. Here goes:

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Xero: A billion-dollar software company that had five years in stealth at the bottom of the planet

    Xero, a cloud-based accounting company that has so far raised $67 million in venture capital, had one hell of a stealth period. By spending its first five years operating only in New Zealand, the company was able to not only build up a strong product – “The Apple of accounting,” as its marketing line goes – but also test it on a sizable market of paying customers, all while evading the attention of legacy competitors. Now, as it is making a serious push in the US, Xero suddenly looks like a major threat to Intuit’s QuickBooks, the dominant player in accounting software, which is attempting to transform itself into an online business.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

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