Pando

April 2014

  1. Consumer Physics' Kickstarter campaign shows that not all crowd funding has to be a dishonest mystery

    As soon as the Kickstarter-campaign for the handheld SCiO molecular sensor went live yesterday – launched by Tel Aviv-based Consumer Physics – I started receiving messages calling scam. The SCiO is a small infrared spectrometer that scans foods and supplies a breakdown to an app of their nutritional information. It's identical to what Tellspec set out to do on Indiegogo, raising $386,392 in dishonest fashion with little idea about how to put the technology into action.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Too hot for Facebook: MeUndies gladly rides ad censorship to record sales

    When you’re an underwear and basics apparel retailer, some of your advertisements are bound to include people in various states of undress. So is the case for MeUndies, an LA-area startup with American Apparel-like sensibilities that offers its goods via subscription and traditional ecommerce.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  3. LA's Youth Business Alliance hopes have high schoolers drinking the entrepreneurial Kool-Aid

    A group of prominent Southern California investors and entrepreneurs will gather tomorrow in Santa Monica to share the power of entrepreneurship with 100 disadvantaged youths from local high schools.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  4. America is a small part of mobile web traffic, but a big part of mobile ad spending

    Living and and breathing ad-tech in America, you hold certain things as given. That is until you speak to people in the industry internationally and realize not everything is the same around the world. For example, iPhone users worldwide aren’t all affluent big-spenders and not all countries are app-hungry maniacs.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  5. With its new anonymous login, Facebook follows through on its users' desire for privacy

    Nothing makes me delete an application faster than seeing I can't do anything unless I connect it to my Facebook account. I don't want to offer my personal information in exchange for access to an application I haven't even used yet. I don't want to let the company behind the app send posts from my account or access my friends list and other personal Facebook data. I downloaded the application because it seemed interesting, not because I wanted to entrust my personal information to yet another company that might or might not abuse whatever it finds.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  6. How a Florida kid's "stupid app” saved his family’s home and landed him on the main stage at Facebook

    Michael Sayman is not your average tech entrepreneur. For one thing, he’s 17 years old and started making money off iOS apps at the age of 13, rivaling even Mark Zuckerberg’s babe-like founder status. He taught himself to code using online tutorials he found via Google.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Facebook builds a mobile web with itself at the center

    Facebook is trying to make mobile apps work a little bit more like the Web.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  8. A "Woo" not a "Woo hoo!" for the Supreme Court over patent trolls

    Half a cheer rather than the traditional three for the Supreme Court's recent decision about patent trolls. It offers judges the ability to force the trolls to pay for their behavior if they should so wish but doesn't actually force them to do so. It's therefore a step in the right direction but it's not a full solution yet. What they've done, in detail, is just define what the word "exceptional" means. I know, it seems fairly trivial, and the ruling's effectiveness will depend upon how many judges decide to use this clarification.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

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