Pando

April 2014

  1. Twitter barely reverses its slowing user growth, but shares still hit all-time low

    One of the biggest red flags going into Twitter's IPO, and one that was reinforced by its first public earnings statement last February, was the fact that Twitter's rate of user growth had been steadily decelerating for over a year. Last quarter was its worst yet in this respect, with the company adding only 9 million monthly active users. That's only a 3.8 percent increase over the previous quarter.

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  2. With the Techtopus wage theft lawsuit settled, all eyes turn to eBay

    The Silicon Valley wage theft class action lawsuit, covered extensively by PandoDaily, reached a settlement last week, just a month before it was due to go to trial in San Jose.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  3. If Apple's stock split reduces the bid ask spread, then why isn't HFT good too?

    Here's a little puzzler for everyone. As people dig through the implications of Apple's stock split we've had a number of pieces trying to work out just why it's beneficial. At one level of theory it should make any damn difference, more shares in existence doesn't change the value of the overall company. Yet the markets note that it does change that value, so what gives?

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Criteo launches cookies in iOS, but mobile dominance may be more elusive

    Paris-based Criteo was an early pioneer in retargeted advertising on the desktop Web. But there’s a different market to conquer in 2014. Today, more than half of the time spent online now occurs via mobile devices. Safari accounts for roughly twice as much mobile Web traffic as Android devices, but has thus far automatically disabled third-party cookies used to help track our browsing behavior. Like others, I’ve question in the past whether mobile advertising means we are entering a post-cookie world.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  5. With Android Silver, Google plans to steal its platform back from manufacturers

    Google is planning to exert more control over its Android operating system with a program, Android Silver, that will require its manufacturing partners to abide by stringent guidelines. The program was initially reported by Android Police and has since been corroborated by the Information, which reports that the program will replace Google's existing Nexus program.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  6. With all that cash, why is Apple borrowing to raise its dividend and buybacks?

    Given that Apple has some $150 billion cash or near equivalents on its balance sheet it seems a little odd, perverse even, that they'll then borrow to finance the extra stock buybacks and raised dividend that they've announced. But that is what they're doing, they're issuing another $17 billion in bonds to finance the shareholder giveaway in what the Wall Street Journal calls the "largest corporate-bond deal in history."

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Amazon launches a fancy marketplace for wearables, but you can't put lipstick on a pig

    The wearables market can be summarized with a single phrase: close, but no cigar.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Apparently founding a start up is the worst possible decision you can make

    If Felix Salmon is to be believed, founding a startup is sheer lunacy. Or at least the message he takes from Gideon Lewis-Kraus's "No Exit."

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

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