Pando

April 2014

  1. Now valued at $10bn, Airbnb decides it no longer has to disrupt hotel taxes

    Of the factors that might go into the "Risk" column if or when Airbnb prepares to IPO, one will certainly appear right at the top: Government.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Machinima's new CEO digs in, lays out a plan to return the MCN to its former glory

    With only one full day under his belt as Machinima’s new CEO, Chad Gutstein has a plan. The former COO of the Ovation cable network spent yesterday in meetings with his new team, mostly listening, he says, but also laying out a four-part playbook meant to allow the online video network to rebound from recent troubles and fulfill its enormous promise.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  3. 2lemetry wants to help us talk to machines, and machines to talk to each other

    Given its potential, the innovations so far seen in the "Internet of Things" been trifling, minor things. Shiny new versions of old machines are given connectivity and we’re handed a one-directional, remote control. For all the hype, all Nest really allows us to do is manipulate our thermostats in a more intelligent way than before. Handy, but not world changing.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  4. The FCC splits hairs on Net Neutrality while the free Internet dies

    The Federal Communications Commission does not plan to include interconnection agreements, like the one announced by Netflix and Comcast in February, in its revised net neutrality rules because they are "not a net neutrality issue," FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said in a press conference on Monday.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Five years in the making, bike alternative Me-Mover surpasses $100,000 Kickstarter goal in 4 days

    Undoubtedly a ubiquitous inconvenience, the drag of leaving one's house to either take public transport or drive into a city to get to work is still just that: an inconvenience. This was Danish architect Jonas Eliasson's thought when he began formulating his transportation device, the Me-Mover.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Vodafone launches its M-Pesa mobile money transfer system in Europe

    There are some squiddeldypop number of startups attempting to get into the money transfer business here in the US. And why not? The fees charged by the banks are extortionate and the market looks both ripe for disruption and very juicy indeed. However, as Josh Hannah pointed out over the weekend here at Pando there's a certain amount of regulatory risk associated with entering the money dealing world. It may be that the juiciness of the market is sufficient to make fighting one's way through the regulatory thicket worth it but it is going to require a great deal of capital to do so.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  7. What Jeremy Rifkin gets wrong about capitalism, communism, and the Internet of Things

    I've often wondered what Jeremy Rifkin is for and I'm afraid that I still haven't come up with a satisfactory solution. What he actually does is almost as puzzling: release a book every few years telling us that the entire planet's about to change in some gloriously unfathomable way, do the book tour then go off to write another one. The last I recall he was telling us that it was going to be the hydrogen economy that ushered in some form of nirvana for us all. The latest campaign appears to be about how the internet of things will do so. That Rifkin thinks this is going to be important makes me bearish on Google's acquisition of Nest.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Sluice uses big data to help Amazon merchants manage demand and never run out of popular items

    Ecommerce is a notoriously unforgiving category in which the slightest bit of operational inefficiency can mean the difference between sustainability and insolvency. There are quite literally thousands of things that can go wrong with the simplest operations. But perhaps nothing is as painful – or common – as running out of stock in a hot item, leaving customers unsatisfied and revenue on the table; or, by the same token, over-ordering an unwanted product and being forced to eat the costs.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

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