Pando

June 2014

  1. Today in are you kidding me?: Quora question asks how Marissa Mayer was "allowed" to oversleep

    It's possible -- very possible -- probable even -- that I'm overthinking this. But I just saw this incredible question posted on Quora...

    By Paul Bradley Carr , written on

    From the News desk

  2. A skeptic's ode to Uber

    Of all the companies I’ve covered in my time at Pando, by far I have lobbed the most crap at Uber. It was perfectly deserved, reporting that needed to be done on their shoddy background check practices, the gaps in their insurance coverage, the way they treat passengers who have been assaulted and reporters who are trying to uncover the truth.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Uhhhh... Occupy Google gets help with "messaging" from Google-funded Silicon Valley think tank

    Earlier this week, a group of 10-30 people descended on Google HQ in Mountain View, California. They were armed with tents, canopies and foldable tables. They called themselves "Occupy Google."

    By Yasha Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Two down, two to go: Another Gawker intern drops suit against former (non-)employer

    A new twist in the ongoing lawsuit against Gawker by a group of former unpaid interns. Hanchen Lu, one of the three remaining plaintiffs, has agreed to voluntarily drop his claim... ...and to the dismissal of all of Lu's claims as set forth in the Complaint. Plaintiff Lu also agrees to opt out of any plaintiff class hereafter certified pursuantto Fed. R. Civ. P. 23. Plaintiff Lu has made a voluntary decision, free from any coercion, to dismiss his claims with prejudice and to discontinue his participation in this action. Plaintiff Lu acknowledges that by doing so he is giving up any right to recovery under the Fair Labor Standards Act ("FLSA") and New York law, including claims for liquidated damages, costs, and attorneys' fees. The move follows an attempt by Gawker's attorneys over the past week to have the entire case thrown out due to Lu's unwillingness to make himself available for deposition. In a "Motion for Sanctions" on June 19th, attorneys Proskauer wrote: Gawker fully recognizes that depositions should be scheduled cooperatively, and that often some negotiation and even change of agreed dates may be required. Plaintiff Lu’s failures, however, go well beyond such normal exchanges. The full letter is embedded below, along with the Stipulation of Voluntary Dismissal. Lu is the second plaintiff to drop his claim against Gawker. Back in April, David Matthews -- who, amusingly once editing Gawker's "Intern Horror Stories" feature, dropped his own claim. merged_66600_-1-1404167901 13231469-0--25280

    By Paul Bradley Carr , written on

    From the News desk

  5. By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  6. US Marshals auction a hulking $18M of Silk Road bitcoins and -- good news! -- nosebleed prices held up

    The bitcoin market just had a major coming-of-age moment as the US Marshals Service (USMS) auctioned off approximately $18 million worth of bitcoins (at market prices) seized from dark web black marketplace Silk Road. The auction is notable for being the largest recorded sale of bitcoin to date, and as such the first significant stress test for the consumer bitcoin price indexes. It’s also an opportunity to verify institutional demand for the burgeoning crypto-currency.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Steve Case on the road: Just as the going gets big, the big leave Nashville

    The Nashville fireside chat is a far cry from its Rise of the Rest tour predecessors. The audience sits in a pristine carpeted room, on the 28th floor of a corporate sky rise, looking out through wall to ceiling windows on the greenery of the city. In the distance, the Titans football stadium looms.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Energetic Bear: Symantec reveals new malware that could sabotage energy infrastructure around the world

    Symantec has discovered new malware from a group called Dragonfly that "could have caused damage or disruption to energy supplies in affected countries," including the United States, and was made to target "energy grid operators, major electricity generation firms, petroleum pipeline operators, and energy industry industrial equipment providers," among other groups.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

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