Pando

“I was working so hard, I was so exhausted and I was so invisible”

By Sarah Lacy , written on November 28, 2017

From The Lessons from the Trenches Desk

Caitlin Freeman-- my guest in this month’s “A Uterus Is a Feature Not a Bug” podcast--  met her husband James Freeman in next door stalls at the Berkeley farmer’s market.

He was obsessive about how to create a perfect cup of coffee. She was obsessive about baking cakes with all natural, organic ingredients that could double as works of art.

They both worked so many hours on these obsessions, they wrecked the existing relationships they were in, and wound up together, in love, in incredibly persnickety, precise, foodie, power-couple heaven.

What happens when a couple like this have kids? With James Freeman’s company Blue Bottle taking off, and her pastry shop sold, Caitlin Freeman decided to become a stay at home mom… at least for a while. She describes it as “great” and “terrible” all at once. “It was the hardest job I’d ever had and no one cared at all about the work I was doing.” She felt “invisible.” And then she felt guilty that just being a mom wasn’t “enough” for her.

Freeman is back at work with a new project inspired by that time she spent with her son and daughter. She noticed that her daughter’s clothes had images of prey on them, but her sons’ clothes were covered by predators. As sexual assault begin to flood the news, she was stuck by the fact, that we are literally dressing our daughters as prey at the youngest ages.

Girls Up Front is her new line of feminist, fierce activewear to correct this problem. Oh yeah, and she’s also working on a new candy factory that promises to be every bit as artisanal and all natural as you’d expect.

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