Pando

Akshat Rathi

Akshat Rathi is Commissioning Editor (Science + Technology) at The Conversation. He has a PhD in organic chemistry from Oxford University and has written for The Economist, The Hindu and Ars Technica, among others.
  1. WhatsApp bought for $19 billion, what do its employees get?

    Facebook has just acquired the mobile messenger service WhatsApp for $19 billion. Launched in 2009 by two former Yahoo employees, in just over four years WhatsApp has grown to 420 million monthly users.

    By Akshat Rathi , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Giant leap for nuclear fusion as lasers blast new route to ultimate energy source

    Researchers in the US have overcome a key barrier to making nuclear fusion reactors a reality. In results published in Nature, scientists have shown that they can now produce more energy from fusion reactions than they put into igniting nuclear fuel for an experiment. The use of fusion as a source of energy remains a long way off, but the latest development is an important step towards that goal.

    By Akshat Rathi , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Nanoparticles cause cancer cells to die and stop spreading

    More than nine in ten cancer-related deaths occur because of metastasis, the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumour to other parts of the body. While primary tumours can often be treated with radiation or surgery, the spread of cancer throughout the body limits treatment options. This, however, can change if work done by Michael King and his colleagues at Cornell University, delivers on its promises, because he has developed a way of hunting and killing metastatic cancer cells.

    By Akshat Rathi , written on

    From the News desk

  4. 10 tiny places that have their own domain names

    Claiming to be a country is easy, but to make others to accept your claim is a lot harder. Aspiring states need favors from great powers, or sometimes even celebrities, to establish their legitimacy. In the digital age, this starts with wanting a top-level domain name, such as the “.in” suffix for India.

    By Akshat Rathi , written on

    From the News desk

  5. New cyber-attack model helps hackers time the next Stuxnet

    Of the many tricks used by the world’s greatest military strategists, one usually works well – taking the enemy by surprise. It is an approach that goes back to the horse that brought down Troy. But surprise can only be achieved if you get the timing right. Timing which, researchers at the University of Michigan argue, can be calculated using a mathematical model – at least in the case of cyber-wars.

    By Akshat Rathi , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Metals in your smartphone have no substitutes

    A few centuries ago, there were just a few widely used materials: wood, brick, iron, copper, gold and silver. Today’s material diversity is astounding. A chip in your smartphone, for instance, contains 60 different elements. Our lives are so dependent on these materials that a scarcity of a handful of elements could send us back in time by decades.

    By Akshat Rathi , written on

    From the News desk