Pando

Cale Guthrie Weissman

  1. The Airbnb/New York spat is coming to a head

    This morning the New York Post reported that the office of New York State's Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is filing an affidavit claiming that two-thirds of Airbnb's New York listings are considered illegal under New York occupancy laws. This comes one day before both the state and the company give opening statements over a proposed subpoena from the Attorney General asking for documents of all New York Airbnb users.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  2. There's now an app store for governments: But will this really make them adopt new technologies faster?

    It's well-known that historically governments have trouble adopting new technologies. We need only look at the initial rollout of Healthcare.gov to see an instance where a government entity had trouble adapting to new digital landscapes. (Of course, today we see a happy update with the announcement that over 8 million people have already signed up.)

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  3. Artist image site OpenAura partners with Getty, AP, and others: Why this is a big win for musicians

    In some ways, technology has made it easier to be a musician. If you have something to sing, you can record it, upload it to Soundcloud or YouTube, and then pray someone discovers it. We see artists like Lorde become pop superstars through the savvy use of these platforms (and a ton of blind luck).

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  4. Recommendation app Sosh partners with OpenTable, continues US expansion

    Local recommendations app Sosh is expanding into two new cities -- Washington and Chicago -- and is also announcing a partnership with OpenTable.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  5. Will starving artists turn to coding instead of waiting tables?

    In the Olden Days, New York was the place for young aspiring artists to find their dream, all while making ends meet via its venerable service industry. To this day, twenty-somethings wear their past waiting traumas on their sleeves to prove their worth as professionals today (myself included -- I was a barista). But the tech industry is now a mainstay of New York's economy. This means there is potentially a new type of entry-level position to help upstarts pay their far-too-expensive rent.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  6. From yoga studios to spas, startups look to niche businesses for the next big market

    An entrepreneur's job is to find a problem that needs fixing. But as more and more startups get founded and funded, a growing number of them are forced to find problems in smaller, niche areas -- areas that people may not think to yield large demand.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  7. Fundbox raises $17.5M aiming to fill small business cash-flow gaps

    Running a business often amounts to juggling cashflow. The unfortunate reality is that expenses often go out long before the resulting revenue comes in. And that's the best case scenario where there's actually revenue. That's one reason I prefer to write about businesses as a journalist, rather than than actually running one. (I can't take the instability, or the bookkeeping.)

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

  8. As Windows XP doomsday comes, what does this mean for your POS system?

    The end is nigh, take cover. As I hope you all know, tomorrow will be Windows XP's "end-of-life." Anyone running the OS will stop receiving software updates.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman

    From the News desk

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