Pando

Cale Guthrie Weissman

  1. NextGuide Web launches. Can it possibly be a discovery powerhouse?

    Dijit Media’s latest venture, NextGuide Web, launched in beta today hoping to provide an easy web destination for TV and movie discovery. It aims to become a staple for home entertainment viewing – whether your use an actual TV or just your computer. In essence, Next Guide Web is just an online TV and movie program guide with some added social dazzle.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  2. For Chris Dixon the next big thing might be bitcoin

    At this month’s PandoMonthly in New York, Dixon, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, talked about the need for a diverse investment portfolio, and part of the thrill of working for such an influential venture capital firm is keeping tabs on what could be the next big thing. Dixon thinks it could be bitcoin.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Portland startup launches transit mobile ticketing service. Is this the future?

    You know that moment when you’re rushing to catch the bus and you realize you don’t have the exact cash fare in your pocket? GlobeSherpa claims it is going to change that. Today, the Portland-based startup announced the launch of the beta program for its mobile ticketing service for the entire Portland TriMet public transit system.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Skyping with elephants: a new paradigm for education

    In April, Think Elephants, a Thailand-based organization that promotes conservation through education, published the results of a study that found that elephants could follow vocal commands telling them to find food hidden in one of two buckets. This suggests that elephants may navigate their physical world in ways that primates and dogs – prior subjects of animal cognition studies – can not. You thought your family pooch was smarter than an elephant? Think again.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  5. The craftsman, the prop master, the boy, and the 3D printer

    3D printers have a long way to go before we'll be fabricating our own clothes, car parts, and assault weapons at home, although one man claims to have printed his own gun. For the most part, though, they've been used primarily by DIYers to create keepsakes and curiosities like this buddha frog, plastic "beer served here" sign, iPhone case, and my personal favorite, a "skull bong w/eyes."

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Is there a need for data-informed pricing? Price Intelligently founders think so

    Pricing a product correctly can seem like a mixture of witchcraft and pure guesswork. Price Intelligently aims to take out that guesswork, offering a service that uses data to better inform pricing decisions. Last Friday the company released its new Value Management system, a software product that encompasses much of the work the company has done since its founding last July.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  7. How can companies adapt to evolving social media expectations?

    For years now, social media has been touted as one of the most important marketing aspects in the tech industry. At first it was important just to have a strong social media presence, now it’s increasingly beneficial to take heed in every social event and interaction surrounding your enterprise. Not only should your business advertise on Twitter, it has become important to respond to Facebook comments and “check in” on Yelp. Startups now are aiming to capitalize on this trend. Social media now both connects private individuals to their friends, as well as people to the brands they like.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Google beware: Wearable technology is more than just seeing and speaking

    Innovations with human-computer interaction technology keep making leaps and bounds. It seems like eons ago when Kinect created a game console that used the human body as a controller; Apple’s Siri made dictating and talking to your phone that much easier (although, definitely not perfect!). Google Glass is bringing the world of Google to a small projected plane of view above your eye. And now there are even competitors for Google Glass even before the product’s release. The Ontario-Based Thalmic Labs is working on the MYO armband, hoping to bring this technology to a new level. If the product lives up to its hype, then not only is wearable technology the wave of the future, but MYO could become a competing technology to Google’s current wearable tech.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  1. Go to page 1.
  2. Go to page 2.
  3. Go to page 28.
  4. Go to page 29.
  5. Go to page 30.