Pando

Carmel DeAmicis

  1. Original GitHub Octocat designer Simon Oxley on his famous creation: "I don't remember drawing it"

    Simon Oxley is the sort of fellow who makes dry jokes so subtle that Americans will miss them. He's not a developer, techie, or household name in Silicon Valley. He's a humble British bloke with a peaceful life in his house in the Oxford countryside, with his Japanese wife and two young sons. In fact, the only thing that hints at his significance in the startup world comes in the form of a few wooden birds, spray painted black and hanging on the walls. Oxley designed the original Twitter bird in 2006 - an elegant, simple creature that decorated the early days of the site. It has since lost the spotlight to the newer cartoon version.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Trymbl wants to be the Warby Parker of beauty products

    So far no one's succeeded at doing for e-commerce beauty products what Warby Parker did for glasses: free samples that consumers can try before buying. Companies like Birchbox ship monthly subscription beauty boxes, but consumers don't pick which samples they receive. Some brands offer limited samples of a couple products while a rare few offer their whole line, but there's no one-stop shop for beauty samples covering a wide range. Perhaps this helps explain why the beauty industry does more than $60 billion in sales annually but only 4.5% of it online. It seems there is that rarest of animals: an untapped market.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Hackeroo: the music fest hackathon experiment

    Twenty-two-year-old Tennessee State senior Andre Woodley had never been to a music festival before he won a coding competition and got invited to hack inside Bonnaroo, a four-day, camping festival extravaganza held on a 700-acre farm in Manchester, Tennessee. In fact, he didn’t hear about the festival's hacking competition until two days before, and applied at the last minute. “It was 3 am in the morning and I wasn’t going to go because I only had 12 hours to hack,” Woodley says. “But then, I had the perfect idea.”

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  4. The startup ranch of Santa Cruz

    I'm writing this on a porch overlooking a garden of berries, flowers, and unsprouted vegetables of dubious variety to my untrained eye. Next to the garden, bees hover over a collection of white boxes full of honeycomb, and perturbed chickens squawk, dissatisfied with their food lot. Dividing the redwoods of Santa Cruz from the farm is a ramshackle building that looks like a stable for horses. Inside, a collection of engineers hover over microchips and airplane prototypes they're developing for what they hope will be an electric flying car.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Galileo starts shipping to Kickstarter backers

    At the Motrr headquarters in Santa Cruz, entrepreneur JoeBen Bevirt tussled his 2-year-old daughter's hair. We were discussing the rotating sphere that Motrr designed that allows users to control what they're looking at in a room while video chatting remotely. After a Kickstarter campaign in March 2012 that raised $700,000 from 5,200, the sphere - dubbed "Galileo" - started shipping to early backers in June, with 7,500 orders.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Braintree doubles payments processed annually to $10 billion

    Today payment platform Braintree announced it hit $10 billion in sales processed annually. In the last six months, it has doubled the amount of transactions it processes, growing rapidly in the hotly contested space of wannabe PayPals.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Kiva partners with Zaarly, Etsy and others to pair marketplaces with microloans

    Mike Stone drove through the streets of San Francisco one night last December, worrying whether he had made a big mistake. He had quit his job at a retail store the month before to launch a business selling DIY kits for making your own wall clocks, cocktails, soy candles, terrariums, and tea blends. A few weeks into the effort, he and his partner had used up their savings, failed at getting their products into fab.com, and were having a "we're going to fail" crisis.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Non-profit Vittana lands CNET's Wolaner as CEO

    Seattle-based Vittana, a non-profit that helps crowdsource loans for students’ secondary educations, has landed a new CEO. Robin Wolaner, former executive Vice President of CNET, founder of Parenting magazine, and recent advisor to start-ups Foli and Skout, will be leading the organization’s expansion.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

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