Pando

Tim Worstall

  1. Should entrepreneurs want to make money or a difference?

    We economist types are routinely derided for being obsessed with money -- for knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing. I plead guilty but not for the reasons you might think. For what we're really saying is that making money is the evidence that you're making a difference. At least, making money as an entrepreneur is. There are method, like rent-seeking, which do bring the cash rolling in but do so by screwing things up for everyone else rather than adding to the pleasures of their lives.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  2. A new parlor game: which tech stocks is David Einhorn shorting?

    This news might cause some consternation among Valley inhabitants who are waiting for their stock to vest but one of Wall Street's more aggressive investors, David Einhorn, has started shorting certain tech stocks on the basis that we're seeing something of a rerun of the dot-com mania. And if he's right some people are going to be very upset indeed when their stock does vest. Bloomberg writes: Greenlight Capital Inc., the $10.3 billion hedge-fund firm run by David Einhorn, said it was betting against a group of technology stocks as evidence grows of a bubble.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  3. The French get interestingly devious over the Uber and taxi fight

    We English tend to be rather suspicious of the French. These strange ideas they have that alcohol is anything other than a way to get drunk, and that food might be enjoyed rather than just being bland fuel. All most, most, un-English. However, we're well aware of the ability of the French, especially their politicians, to be interestingly devious, duplicitous even. And so it is with the new proposed regulations just issued concerning the spats between Uber and other ride-sharing companies and the taxi drivers in Paris.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Indonesia's ludicrous idea of taxing expensive smartphones

    Indonesia is looking to introduce import duties on the more expensive smartphones, something that strikes most economists as being somewhere between barkingly mad and ludicrous. The argument in support is that the local manufacturers only make low-end phones so raising the tax on the high-end phones won't affect them.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  5. If online sales taxes reduce Amazon sales then why does Amazon support online sales taxes?

    An excellent little piece of economic research here detailing the manner in which the imposition of online sales taxes reduce Amazon's sales in those places where they are imposed. All of which creates a bit of a headscratcher as Amazon has recently come around to the idea that online sales taxes are a pretty neat idea. In the absence of a collective brain spasm we've got to assume that Amazon sees some benefit to the company in sales taxes being imposed even if this forces its sales down.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Your obligatory Earth Day post

    I can never recall whether it's we hurrying to hell in a handcart or whether we're supposed to think of that handcart hurtling towards us. But whichever way around it is today's the day we're supposed to worry about it all, how the ecosystem that supports us all is about to go "poof" in a splurge of our own greed and consumerism. That is, it's Earth Day once again.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  7. What worries me about the Jason Padgett story

    Two things that worry me about the Jason Padgett story in fact. Padgett being the guy who got punched in the head and turned into a mathematical savant as a result: A self-proclaimed former "goof" and college dropout has told how he became a maths genius after suffering a traumatic brain injury

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Ethanol is officially a bust. Can we now get politics out of money, please?

    We've long known that sticking corn into auto fuel tanks is an entire waste of effort in the fight against climate change. Food is for people not cars, just as an opening point, and David Pimentel proved a decade ago that brewing up booze that we can't drink but burn instead causes more carbon emissions rather than fewer. We've now got a further report pointing out that even just using the corn stover (ie, the bits of corn that we can't eat) doesn't do any better: The findings by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln team of researchers cast doubt on whether corn residue can be used to meet federal mandates to ramp up ethanol production and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

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