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Christopher Lochhead

Christopher is a co-founder and partner at Play Bigger Advisors. You can follow him on Twitter here.

  1. The three risks

    Let’s begin off with some cheery facts. Most technology companies fail. Some research suggests that three out of four venture backed companies don’t make it, and less than 1 percent achieve an initial public offering.

    By Christopher Lochhead , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Yahoo didn't buy Tumblr. They bought Tumblr's market position

    Critics of Yahoo’s purchase of Tumblr think buying a company with little revenue for $1.1 billion dollars is dumb. They argue Yahoo is paying too high of a premium, based on Tumblr’s financials. These critics do not understand what Yahoo is buying.

    By Christopher Lochhead , written on

    From the News desk

  3. In Silicon Valley, it's good to be king

    Silicon Valley is a mythic place, and the San Francisco Bay Area’s allure is well earned. We have a healthy startup ecosystem with a proven track record of nurturing big entrepreneurial winners. It seems you can’t go a week without reading about how some other part of the world is trying to be “the next Silicon Valley.”

    By Christopher Lochhead , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Committees: A Great Source of Terrible Marketing

    “If you want to kill any idea in the world, get a committee working on it.” – Charles Kettering

    By Christopher Lochhead , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Don’t Let the Money Make You a Dummy

    Technology IPOs are stacking up like groupies at a Motley Crue concert. Dozens of companies, including Palo Alto Networks, ServiceNow, Workday, and the mac daddy of them all, Facebook, are planning public stock offerings this year. And the flood of wealth they create could trigger a wave of startups and angel investing in the coming 24 months, fueled by the newly rich.

    By Christopher Lochhead , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Why Facebook Should Buy Pinterest Next

    Facebook’s purchase of Instagram was brilliant, because photosharing is one of the core functions that made Facebook what it is. But Facebook was born before the smartphone explosion. Today most people take and share photos with their phones. And smartphone sales are on fire. Research firm Gartner says people bought 472 million smartphones in 2011 and fourth quarter worldwide sales were up almost 50%. Buying Instagram locks Facebook’s position as the number one photo-sharing site in the post-PC era.

    By Christopher Lochhead , written on

    From the News desk