Pando

Dan Raile

  1. An Israeli company delivers Lebanese citizens from the clutches of its own government

    One morning last week, I awoke to find that some Lebanese friends of mine had been posting on Facebook throughout the Levantine morning about using Viber, a mobile communications app acquired by Japan's Rakuten for $900 million in February that allows free calls and text messaging. .

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  2. "Google Buses Pay $1 per stop, but it costs me $2 to ride MUNI": Logical fallacy explained

    I defy anyone in San Francisco to attend any public event that in any way involves the forthcoming "Google Bus" Pilot Project without hearing at least one reference to the unfairly low fee that Google, et al, will be paying for using Muni bus stops.

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  3. SF Board of Supervisors president announces new legislation to regulate Airbnb

    San Francisco Board of Supervisors President David Chiu announced legislation this afternoon that aims to regulate the short-term rental ecosystem in the city. In doing so, Chiu demonstrated keen balance in walking the fine line between economic development and citizen’s grievances. It’s one of a series of ongoing attempts at City Hall to bring the city’s regulatory system up to date with developments in the sharing economy.

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Entitle builds a bookshelf in the mobile universe, and North Carolina

    Entitle CEO Bryan Batten is an unlikely librarian. Gangly, tan and sea-worn, the Wilmington, N.C., native might seem more at home on the pro surf circuit than in back room meetings with New York publishing house executives or Silicon Valley investors. But as Entitle, his digital book subscription company, closes in on 200,000 available titles, Batten might be the most important biblio-curator in the land.

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Google exec tries to evict tenants, creates a media win for anti-tech protesters

    8am this morning, and by the time I arrived at the corner of 19th and Dolores in San Francisco’s Mission district, only two protesters had showed up. Still, the street was already teeming with tripods and booms and audio equipment. A pair of cattle gates were propped against a nearby wall and an ominously full-looking, covered baby carriage waited next to them. On the ground was a bullhorn. KPIX and KRON vans were parked across the street.

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  6. SF's tech shuttle pilot project is going to create some really big data, appropriately enough

    The smoke has cleared, the dust has settled. The last gasp of resistance to the San Francisco Commuter Shuttle Policy and Pilot Project was voted down last Tuesday, and now, after years of white-knuckled waiting for the Goldberg machine of city administration to run its course, the folks at the Municipal Transportation Agency can finally start regulating employee shuttles, known colloquially as ‘Google buses’.

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Everyman Iron Man: Ekso hopes to bring "human augmentation" to the masses

    Ekso Bionics co-founder and CEO Nate Harding shares some key traits with Tony Stark.

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

  8. As US wrestles with regulations, Europe provides friendly skies for commerical drones

    As the US government continues to wrestle with the legality and desirability of commercial drones, our friends in Europe seem to be ahead of the game. The European Commission has today announced it will develop Europe-wide regulations around the use of civic and commercial drones (which they insist on calling “remotely piloted aircraft systems, or RPAS which is no fun at all).

    By Dan Raile , written on

    From the News desk

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