Pando

David Holmes

  1. "I'm more similar to Elon." The 5 silliest things Chris Sacca said yesterday

    Chris Sacca is a rich man and is therefore occasionally asked to say things on television. As an early investor in Twitter and Uber, Sacca is living proof that you don't have to be right all the time -- or even most the time -- to make a fortune in Silicon Valley. As for his influence, it's likely more than mere coincidence that Dick Costolo stepped down not long after Sacca wrote 8,500 words on everything the Twitter CEO had been doing wrong. (Plus, he's also a poet when it comes to profanity, as this supercut of the most vulgar PandoMonthly moments proves).

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  2. "These aren't real journalists, Richard. They're tech journalists.” Last night’s “Silicon Valley,” reviewed

    In every arena where money and power collide to create that amorphous entity known as "influence," there's a potential for the journalists who cover it to become corrupted. Whether in politics, finance, or increasingly tech, the closer a reporter comes to her sources and subjects, the greater the opportunity for favoritism.

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  3. Can Apple save the music industry from the destructive greed of record labels?

    Between its shameful offshore tax avoidance schemes, felonious efforts to drive down wages, and alleged human rights violations at its factories, Apple is one of Big Tech's biggest villains.

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  4. "It’s ok to say you’re a woman CEO." Overcoming discrimination and finding the courage to be a woman in tech

    For an industry that can't stop talking about its commitment to diversity, you'd think Silicon Valley would have corrected some of its gender problems by now. Imagine if every time a big tech firm released a diversity report or every time the creators of television's Silicon Valley apologized for their gender biases, a female founder closed a funding round. Come Christmas, the women in tech would easily outnumber the men.

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  5. Who's the real bully in the Facebook/Designbook fight? The answer may surprise you

    By and large, Americans are wildly forgiving when it comes to corporate misconduct, whether that means offshore tax avoidance, environmental impropriety, or even human rights abuses -- as long as they happen far far away, of course.

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  6. Bandpage wants to make artists more money -- but it will need more than Rhapsody

    Is there any tech vertical more hotly-contested in 2015 than digital music?

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  7. The Information costs $400 a year. So why don't its writers understand how startup valuations work?

    When you're gonna charge $399 a year-- almost six times as much as The New Yorker -- and call yourself "the most valuable source of news about the technology industry for the world’s professionals," you should probably understand startup valuations. We don't usually offer critiques of posts from paywalled sites, but one from "The Information" yesterday was just... well, bizarre.

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

  8. "Ex Machina" brilliantly captures the horror and hubris of the modern tech CEO

    (If you live in New York, you can still catch Ex Machina on the big screen at Nitehawk Cinema. It's definitely worth seeing in a theater, and also Nitehawk is the best).

    By David Holmes

    From the News desk

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