Pando

David Sirota

  1. Entertainment wants to be accessible, not free

    Remember a few years back when Hollywood studios tried -- and famously failed -- to ram the Stop Online Piracy Act through Congress? Well, two things have happened since a coalition of Silicon Valley companies, technology think tanks, and grassroots activists blocked passage of that draconian bill.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  2. If Snowden is a criminal, why aren't the heads of the NSA and ODNI being prosecuted too?

    For months, a debate has raged over the status of NSA leaker Edward Snowden. In the back and forth, one question has dominated: Is he or is he not a whistleblower with all the attendant protections that should (but often don’t) come with such a designation?

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Labor and the Information Economy: Which side are you on, Ed?

    For a reminder of fear's determinative impact on the 21st century labor market - even at the highest reaches of the information economy -- look no further than last week's on-air meltdown by radio host and MSNBC personality Ed Schultz.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Disruption vs Intransigence: A tale of two political parties

    From Occupy Wall Street protests two years ago in lower Manhattan to recent angst bubbling up against tech-industry gentrification in San Francisco, economic inequality is becoming the animating issue from coast to coast. Not surprisingly, then, inequality is concurrently becoming a deeply political story that exposes the two parties' internal dynamics and their contrasting attitudes toward change.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  5. For economic stimulus, pensions beat stadiums and server farms

    Yesterday in San Francisco, activists surrounded a Google shuttle bus in protest of the city's tax-subsidized gentrification and its widening gap between rich and poor. Two years after Occupy Wall Street captivated the nation, this kind of righteous economic angst is now the defining political emotion of the moment, with no less than President Obama and the Pope both recently inveighing against economic inequality.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Detroit's financial criminals leave evidence the size of a hockey stadium

    Every now and again there's a piece of crystal clear evidence left at the scene of a complex financial crime that shows, beyond any reasonable doubt, what went down.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  7. The journalist who hacked the old system

    With Edward Snowden becoming a leading candidate for Time magazine's Person of the Year, it is important to remember that he is the central character in not one but three distinct stories: 1) the story of what his disclosures tell us about the US government's surveillance system, 2) the story of what the treatment of him and the reporters publicizing his disclosures says about attitudes toward whistleblowing and First Amendment protections, and 3) the story of the rapidly changing power dynamics in the age of digital media.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Under cover of Thanksgiving, SEC postpones "final" lobbying ethics rule

    When the federal government quietly releases something in the din of Thanksgiving week, it usually means it's something bad - something lawmakers are legally required to disclose, but something they really don't want the public to know about. And when the agency releasing the information is the famously corrupt Securities and Exchange Commission, "bad" is likely too weak a word. In fact, you can almost a guarantee something truly hideous is happening.

    By David Sirota , written on

    From the News desk

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