Pando

Farhad Manjoo

  1. What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

    When Eduardo Saverin was 13, his family discovered that his name had turned up on a list of victims to be kidnapped by Brazilian gangs. Saverin’s father was a wealthy businessman in São Paulo, and it was inevitable that he’d attract this kind of unwanted attention. Now the family had to make a permanent decision. They hastily arranged a move out of the country. And of all the places in the world they could move to, the Saverin family saw only one option. They took their talents to Miami.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Nobody Seems to Understand What Jeff Bezos is Doing. Does He?

    A couple months ago, realizing it would be futile to hold out any longer against the tsunami of pop cultural peer pressure, I decided to go ahead and read The Hunger Games. I jumped over to Amazon, searched for the Kindle edition, and I was presented, as usual, with a page infested with ugly strikethroughs. This is Amazon’s way: Jeff Bezos will never just show what you’re going to pay when you buy something from his site. He also wants to make sure you know what you’re not paying. When you buy The Hunger Games for your Kindle, you won’t pay $14.99, the publisher’s suggested digital price. You also won’t pay $8.99, the publisher’s suggested price for the paperback—which happens to be what Barnes & Noble will charge you a Nook version of The Hunger Games.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  3. How HelloFax, FreshBooks, and Expensify Map the Hidden Networks of Small Businesses

    About a year ago, I stumbled upon a tiny new Web app that changed my life. It wasn’t Instagram. It wasn’t Pinterest. Unlike so many hot apps these days, this one didn’t have anything to do with local commerce, it wasn’t mobile, and while it was “social,” it was only surreptitiously so. Over time, the app might help me uncover the invisible social network that surrounds much of my work life—but I’m getting ahead of the story. What attracted me to this app a year ago didn’t have anything to do with social networking. Instead, I was looking for relief from the most mundane, hellish of all office tasks: Faxing.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Everybody Chill Out: Apple is a Long-Term Goldmine

    When I left the country–and much of the Internet–to go on vacation three weeks ago, the tech world still seemed halfway sane. Instagram was just a super-cool dozen-or-so-person start-up, not a billion-dollar behemoth. Google’s augmented reality glasses were only a zany rumor, not a confessed roadmap. And beneath it all, Apple was still the surest bet in tech: On the strength of monster sales of the iPhone, the new iPad, and the news that it would begin offering a tiny dividend, AAPL had surged by more than 50 percent since the start of the year, and its future appeared limitless.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Why "Don’t Be Evil" Is Evil, and Why Google Isn’t So Bad

    Early in 2000, a tiny but much-beloved search company held an employee meeting to figure out something that all successful firms feel they have to face at a certain point: What should we be about?

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  6. It’s the battery, stupid: The looming 4G smartphone crisis

    What’s your favorite thing about your smartphone? Is it its minimalist design? Its pretty interface? How about the fantastic HD display, the apps, 4G networking, or great cloud backups? Or maybe it’s all of those things? If someone were to ask me what I like about my phone—my year-and-a-half old iPhone 4—I’d likely say some combination of these factors. I like the OS, I like the display, and I like that there are a whole lot of apps in the store to help me goof off.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Amazon's brilliant plan to pay you crazy money for your iPad 2

    It’s been three days since Tim Cook unveiled the new iPad, but you’re still stuck with your trusty old iPad 2. You’re keen to get rid of it so you can buy the new one, but you forgot to log in to one of those buy-back sites before Wednesday’s launch. Predictably, the announcement sent trade-in values plummeting—before the launch, some of these sites were offering close to $300 for your entry-level iPad 2 (the 16GB Wi-Fi model), provided it was in “good” condition. Now they’re willing to part with far less: As of Saturday morning, if you’ve got a well-cared-for iPad 2, NextWorth will give you $241 for it. BuyBackMac is offering $224. eBay’s Instant Sale will net you $200. And Gazelle, the most popular of the buy-back sites, will only part with $185.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Starting a Business is Easy, But Starting a Company is Too Damn Hard

    Well, I’m a corporation. And it feels great! For many years, I’ve been a mere sole proprietor, a fledgling one-man band in the eyes of the IRS. But due to some financial changes in my life—a book deal, a New Year’s resolution to become more organized with my money, a realization that I could slightly lower my tax bill by changing my status—I recently decided to create an S-corporation out of which to pursue my various Internet scribblings. I suspected that becoming Farhad Manjoo, Inc., would be something of a hassle, but that going through the incorporation process would nevertheless be an interesting exercise, a way to see what it’s like to start a small business.

    By Farhad Manjoo , written on

    From the News desk

  1. Go to page 1.
  2. Go to page 2.
  3. Go to page 3.
  4. Go to page 4.