Pando

Francisco Dao

  1. Creating the perfect world is trickier than you think

    In the movie "Ruby Sparks," a novelist played by Paul Dano falls in love with a character he’s written, whom he believes is the ideal woman. Eventually, she comes to life and they have a relationship. But despite the fact that he created her based on his image of the perfect girl, and can even alter her personality through his writing, he finds dating the real life Ruby to be much more complicated than he imagined.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  2. Life turns on just a few moments

    Have you ever wondered how your life turned out the way it did? Or if you're young and just starting out, what will determine your future? Most people think the course of their lives are wholly born from the fruits of their own hands, but the truth is that life is mostly determined by just a few moments that are often decided by someone else.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  3. Hustle and flow

    I have a good friend who, in an attempt to look productive and important, is constantly tweeting and posting about how hard he’s hustling. Not only are his boasts painfully transparent, but sadly, his ideas about what makes someone effective are usually just plain wrong. For example, a few days ago he posted a motivational video with the following quotes: "If you're going to be successful, you gotta be willing to give up sleep..." and "...you gotta want to be successful so bad you forgot to eat" -- that's for real. This is flat out ridiculous. How can someone possibly perform at their best if they’re not sleeping and forgetting to eat? If you’re the CEO or a manager at your company, do you want your employees coming into work exhausted and starving? Do you think anyone can do quality work while they’re in such a condition? Of course not. And yet my friend is not alone in buying into the “crushed and crushing it” mentality of work.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  4. Is it better to be motivated by money or ego?

    Over dinner last week, my friend Micah explained there are essentially two types of bloggers, those motivated by money and those motivated by ego. As he made his argument about the different incentives and behaviors of each group, I started thinking about how entrepreneurs also fit into these same motivational categories.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  5. Entrepreneurship has become as commoditized as college

    As most of you know, the tech industry has made a sport out of bashing college. One of the core criticisms of higher education is that college degrees have become ubiquitous and commoditized. The argument posits that so many institutions of suspect quality are handing out degrees like candy that college has lost its value as a reliable credential and is therefore no longer worth pursuing. Having graduated with a useless degree from Cal State Northridge, I generally agree with this argument when applied to middle of the road schools.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  6. Operating on a character driven OS

    Nine years ago, after starting several businesses that had left me dissatisfied, I decided I would stop focusing on money and only pursue things that were interesting to me. At the time, I just wanted to do something fun. But what I didn’t realize back then was that I was actually switching my personal operating system from one based on money to one based on character, and the change would be far more profound than I could have ever imagined.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  7. By definition, Silicon Valley has few legitimate entrepreneurs

    In the New York Times excerpt of Nick Bilton’s upcoming book about Twitter, there’s a line where he mentions how it’s an oddity that startup founders refer to themselves as “entrepreneurs,” since many of them “have no understanding of how to run a business or turn a profit.”

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

  8. How Silicon Valley limits your thinking

    People often point out the “anything is possible” spirit of Silicon Valley, but there’s a downside to the constant talk. For those still searching for their true calling, or even just an opportunity that resonates with them, the entrepreneurial buzz is both distracting and surprisingly narrow.

    By Francisco Dao

    From the News desk

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