Pando

Francisco Dao

  1. Is tech really the right bet for Anytown USA?

    These days just about every place is trying to create its own Silicon Valley. Everyone is so completely sold on technology as the savior of the economy, we now have Silicon Canal, Silicon Slopes, Silicon Sandbar, four Silicon Beaches, three Silicon Prairies, and a dozen other Silicon named areas just in the United States. Overseas we have Silicon Glen, Silicon Fen, Silicon Wadi, Silicon Welly, and the list goes on.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  2. VCs, Sears, and the disappearing middle market

    A few weeks ago, I was chatting with Satya Patel of Homebrew about trends in the venture capital industry.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  3. The perfect opiate for the masses

    Most people, including me, are unhappy about the government shutdown. But unlike most people, I haven’t taken to social media to bellyache about it, or worse, make snarky remarks. Does anybody really think House Republicans willing to sabotage the government are going to cave under the pressure of tweets?

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Loving what you do is not enough

    Everywhere you turn, the advice is the same. Love your work. Love your startup. Do what you love, and you’ll never work again. In the startup world, it seems the Beatles were right, all you need is love. But when it comes to being the best you can be in work and life, there is something else that nobody talks about anymore.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Why online brands don’t have lasting value

    The importance of brand building is a consistently popular topic for entrepreneurs. But when we take a closer look at what gives company marks their value, it becomes clear that online brands will never amount to much. The problem is inherent to the medium of the Internet itself, a constraint that affects all online properties equally. In a nutshell, it is almost impossible to provide a truly distinguished experience to the user. As a result, online interactions, and by extension online brands, are essentially commodities.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  6. The trolls have won

    Contrary to popular belief, the dominant culture on the Web isn’t lolcats or even porn, it’s trolls and bullying. They’ve won the Internet, and many of us have cheered them on while they waged their war against civility.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Growing up fast and slow

    When we think about adolescence, most people accept that kids are growing up faster than ever. This is not a new critique leveled only at young people of today but something that has been observed for decades. The internet has accelerated this process by giving kids a range of access that has essentially removed the barriers of the adult world. When we factor in societal trends such as teen sexualization and online dangers, the idea of growing up slowly 1950’s style seems laughably naive.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  8. The market for idiocy

    In 1970, future Nobel Prize winning economist George Akerlof published a paper titled "The Market for 'Lemons': Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism" in which he explained how markets characterized by asymmetric information between sellers and buyers commonly resulted in declining quality of products offered for sale. In order to illustrate his argument he provided the example of a used car market flooded by “lemons,” low quality vehicles that appeared to be in good condition.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

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