Pando

Francisco Dao

  1. A guess at Path's brilliant valuation strategy

    Anyone who has studied pricing knows that we commonly perceive value based on the most readily available reference points. In a practice known as "price anchoring," fashion and luxury stores have been exploiting this psychological glitch for years by showing us the highest priced products first. Once we see a $1,500 suit or a $2,000 handbag, everything else seems like a good deal. This is how we get fooled into thinking a $50 t-shirt at the Armani store is a bargain while down the street Target is selling a six-pack of t-shirts for $10. At the Armani store, the starting reference point is $1,500, while at Target it’s a $2 tube of toothpaste. In comparison to the available price references, Target’s t-shirts seem expensive.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Why startup culture is such a fragile and precious thing

    Have you ever wondered what creates startup culture? Most people associate it with words like “scrappy” and “passion” but never explain what drives people to be scrappy or passionate in the first place. It has become one of those terms that everyone tosses around and pretends to understand while nobody comes clean because they don’t want to be the first to admit they don’t know what they’re talking about. People assume all startups are naturally endowed with some kind of pixie dust that makes everyone love what they’re doing so much that they’re willing to work 80-hour weeks, yet it’s never explained where this magical culture comes from.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  3. I’ve come to hate so much of the internet

    To say I have a love/hate relationship with the Internet would be selling short both “love” and “hate.” On the one hand, the Internet is such a significant part of my life that when people ask me where I’m from, I sometimes answer, “I’m from the Internet.” I make a significant part of my living from the Internet. My friends are on the internet. Much of my learning comes from the internet, and without question, I can never fully disconnect from it.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Mo’ people, mo’ problems

    A good friend of mine always seems to choose the most complicated option for whatever he’s doing. When he’s starting a business, and he has started several, he never does it alone or with a co-founder or even with employees. Instead, there is always an array of strategic partners, contractors, sponsors, volunteers, and every other tertiary player you can think of. When he moves his residence, instead of looking for a simple apartment, he tries to arrange a collection of roommates, so he can get a big house that he envisions as a kind of live/work commune.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Why startups rarely change the world

    I’m sure nobody wants to hear this and I’ll be viciously attacked for suggesting it, but despite the constant refrain from entrepreneurs that they’re trying to change the world, startups rarely do anything significantly world-changing. It’s not really their fault, changing the world almost always requires massive amounts of money, groundbreaking technology, and a lot of time -- three things most startups don’t have.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  6. “Change-washing” and the new groupie delusion

    At almost every nightclub in Hollywood there’s a VIP section that rarely ever contains more than a couple of actual VIPs. Instead, they’re populated by groupies, “somebody’s” friends, and various other wannabe types. For every star or legitimate VIP in LA there are hundreds, if not thousands, of these dreamers running up bar tabs, buying trendy clothes, and trying as hard as they can to play the part of the doers without doing much of anything. Fueled by the groupie delusion, these people spend money to appear “as if” without actually being who they pretend to be.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  7. You can’t fix what you don’t understand

    When you look at Walmart, what do you see? A store? Dying brick and mortar commerce? Badly dressed poor people? If you’re an entrepreneur looking for massive opportunities, what you should see is a business empire with almost $500 billion in sales, 2.2 million employees, 8,500 stores, 25 percent of all grocery sales in the United States, and most importantly, a mastery of supply chain logistics that its competitors have been unable to match.

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

  8. For men, “leaning out” just isn’t an option

    While Sheryl Sandberg and the pro-women movement encourage women to “lean in,” what’s never discussed is the relentless pressure men feel to not “lean out.”

    By Francisco Dao , written on

    From the News desk

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