Pando

Erin Griffith

  1. HearMyPitch, The Brand-Startup Matchmaker

    Advertising is the monetization plan for many of the hottest consumer Internet startups. But for brand new companies, nailing down that first brand partnership is a daunting task. It's an experience Jeffrey Cutler, now Director of Digital Strategy at Team Epic, knows well. He spent a chunk of time "literally running up and down Madison Avenue," he says, as Director of Marketing at Going.com before it sold to AOL in 2009. The time sink required to court brands and agencies is frustrating and full of dead ends. It's even difficult for the biggest, arguably most successful consumer Internet startups: Twitter's New York headquarters are on none other than Madison Avenue and Facebook has invested serious money and manpower into courting the ad world. Smaller startups are competing with them for attention--you can imagine who gets the meeting and in, turn, the ad dollars.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  2. ThrillCall Launches App With Exclusive Event Offers

    Touring is typically a musician's primary source of revenue. So it's surprising that the music industry hasn't really upgraded the way it keeps fans updated on upcoming shows. There are social media blasts, but mostly, musicians just use email.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  3. SecondMarket to Launch Internal Stock Exchanges to Stop Talent Hemorrhage at Media Companies

    When a big company, particularly a media conglomerate, acquires a startup, the startup's employees tend to lose all incentive to perform. They've made their money, and even if they get AOL stock, or Gannet stock, or IAC stock, their actions and the success of their individual unit probably won't move the needle on the conglomerate's overall value.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Chirpify Facilitates Scarily Seamless Twitter Payments

    Sell Simply launched last year with the goal of changing Twitter from a content platform to a marketplace. After a few months of testing and 300 transactions, the company relaunched today as a full Twitter commerce platform with a new name--Chirpify.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Zynga Addresses 'Issues With Mark as a Person' in First Ever Earnings Call

    Do not call it "gaming." Zynga is a "play" company, even if its leader is a less than playful dude. On their first ever quarterly earnings call, Zynga's executives, including CEO Mark Pincus, were asked to "talk about Mark as a person." Bringing up a somewhat legit concern that could in no way be actually answered by Mark himself, one analyst asked Pincus to address "issues people have had" about him and his management style." That's analyst-speak for, "Why are you so terrible?," a question I can't imagine ever received a reasonable response.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  6. The Small Cap IPO Ghetto

    Say that, for the past five or ten years, you've poured your life into a startup. Say it's not consumer-facing and flies just below the mainstream radar. Still, you've raised venture capital, picked up clients, and actually gained some traction. Maybe even disrupted something.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Myspace Pins User Gain on Music Player…But How?

    MySpace added one million users this month, a pleasantly surprising development for new owners Specific Media and CEO Tim Vanderhook. The social network, which seemed doomed to atrophy under News Corp.'s ownership, attributes this sudden growth to MySpace's music player, a feature it added in December.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  8. "You're Not Happy and Neither are We"--Lessons From Wahooly's Crash-And-Burn Launch

    Last week, after around six months of toiling away on product, pimping it to bloggers, and engaging with his startup's 28,000 beta sign-ups, Wahooly co-founder Dana Severson clicked a button to transfer Wahooly's files from a development server to a launch-ready server. The process was supposed to take 24 hours, ending at the precise moment the countdown clock on Wahooly's site reached zero--launch time--and coinciding exactly with a TechCrunch story and a wide email blast.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

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