Pando

Erin Griffith

  1. How did Exposure crack the photosharing code? By charging its users

    Over the weekend, Exposure, the latest in a what feels like a never-ending parade of doomed photosharing apps, did something rather shocking: It racked up a ton of users in a short period of time. More than 10,000 to be exact. The photos they shared have been viewed half a million times.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  2. How MilkMade is turning a boutique ice cream company into a venture-backed startup

    MilkMade isn't a traditional startup, but it's also not a traditional food company. Founder Diana Hardeman has eschewed the usual routes to success in consumer packaged goods, which usually involves private equity, Whole Foods distribution, and shipping partnerships. She's also steered clear of the path some of her food industry peers have taken, entrenching themselves in a local market with catering gigs, food trucks, and local stores. Both of those approaches can yield successful businesses, but that's wasn't the way Hardeman wanted to build MilkMade.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Freight Farms raises $1.2 million for greenhouses built in old shipping containers

    Often companies that go through accelerator programs are accused of not being ambitious enough. Investors kvetch that that the startup ideas offered are "incremental" or "unoriginal."

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Here's why Twitter's CEO doesn't see the company as "the anti-Facebook"

    Twitter's IPO was in many ways defined by what Facebook's IPO was not. The company's pre-IPO acquisition was a nuts-and-bolts adtech company like Mopub, not a shocking $1 billion play for a hot zero revenue app like Instagram. The company's CEO was an experienced operations guy in his 40's, not a young, hoodie-wearing visionary. Where Facebook's S-1 featured a manifesto about "The Hacker Way" that Mark Zuckerberg wrote on this phone, Twitter's S-1 featured a simple, straightforward "thank you" to its users that made Facebook's antics look downright childish.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Medium gets even magazine-ier

    Magazine is an adjective, I promise.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  6. This is how you do "founder-friendly": Kima Ventures promises investments in 15 days

    After decades of little change, venture capital is in a period of rapid evolution. New platforms like AngelList are cutting out seed investment firms. Up-and-coming funds with hot "brands" are stealing away deal flow from established VC's. And providing services like marketing and recruiting is now table-stakes for a venture firm. VC's are selling themselves to startups as much as startups are selling themselves to VC's.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Work--Bench announces $10 million fund to back enterprise startups

    Work--Bench opened its doors in June as New York's first "post accelerator," a program designed to help later stage enterprise startups -- ones with funding, a product, and early traction -- connect with large corporate customers. Now it has $10 million to back enterprise companies of its own.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  8. New York's hackathon superhero sells his hackathon hack to Intel

    If you've ever gone to a hackathon, you've likely encountered a person named Mike Swift. Typically sporting a smile and a SendGrid t-shirt, Swift (who goes by Swift) has been involved with every single one of the ten or so hackathons I've attended.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

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