Pando

James Robinson

  1. TJ Miller's Crunchies disaster shouldn't have surprised TechCrunch, or anyone else

    Attendees of this week's Crunchies award ceremony were shocked at host T.J. Miller's tone deafness on the matters of gender and race in Silicon Valley.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  2. To counter growing vulnerabilities, publicity shy Fitbit launches eight-figure marketing blitz

    As I wrote here on Pando at the end of last month, the various splutterings of the wearables market combined with the emergence of the Apple Watch have represented the end of a golden age for Fitbit, one where it only had to show up and take home massive swaths of market share.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Five technology lessons I learned from my own foray into small business

    In July, as I wrote here on Pando, I self-published an actual, real book based on a blog I used to write. It came on the back of a $15,000 Kickstarter haul in November 2013. The book is out now, rewards have been shipped, and I have closed the book on the slog of production and shipping rewards.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Google is the biggest corporate lobbyist in America now, says new Public Citizen report

    I’ve been in Boston all week. I had to tell my mother where I was, but not Google. Its seamlessness in switching up my Google ad results, changing its suggestions to me of places to visit and ads to click on, was instantaneous.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  5. By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  6. For Keen Home, the exploding smart home market is an opportunity and a puzzle

    Oh, the smart home and the chaos of an exploding space.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Autodesk take aim at the disappointment of 3D printing

    Last September, Autodesk opened a large two-story workshop on Pier 9 on San Francisco's Embarcadero, a luxuriant facility with the indulgent goal of bringing its employees closer to the machines they were making software for.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Thanks to the Apple Watch, 2014 is the year that Fitbit moved quickly back into the pack

    Fitbit was a rare beast in 2007 when it was founded: an actual hardware startup in a time when such a thing was laughed at, taking the humble pedometer and giving it a huge software upgrade. The company took a big retailer first approach, slowly building out a network of 30,000 stores in 28 countries, staying relatively under the radar. It's held big time competition from Nike's FuelBand at bay and laps Jawbone's UP band in sales. Last Christmas it had 77 percent of the retail market. And this is all despite spending no money on marketing and having a CEO in James Park positively allergic to theatrics and hype.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

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