Pando

James Robinson

  1. Inventables' new 3D carver wants to give the maker movement new life

    The last time I spoke to Inventables CEO Zach Kaplan he’d launched the company’s new Easel software platform at SXS, a program designed to take the prohibitively inaccessible complexities of 3D design more manageable.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Let's stop focusing on why wearables might change the world and deal with market reality

    As far as 50-page existential ponderings on the current state and future direction of wearable technology go, The Wearable Future -- a new report released Tuesday as part of PwC’s consumer intelligence series -- is a doozy.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  3. TellSpec's recent PR offensive only highlights just how great a scam it really was

    As Pando has covered, Toronto-based TellSpec panhandled on Indiegogo to the tune of almost $400,000 last October, pretending that its small handheld food scanner, that could tell you the nutritional values of your food, was production-ready.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  4. What's In A Name? The fading tyranny of dot com

    We’ve all been there. We click on a link, but then pause a second. There’s a “.net” or a “.org” at the end of the address. We think against our better nature, “What is this, amateur hour?” Doesn’t this company understand how the Internet works?

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  5. It's time to admit that bad journalism is enabling crowdfunding scampaigns

    Yesterday, from Indiegogo's weekly email, I came across the campaign for Pavlok, a wearable wristband that shocks you every time you do something naughty, to help you break bad habits. In three days now, it has been featured on NPR, Fox News, The Colbert Report, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Business Insider, Engadget, ABC News, Fortune, the Huffington Post, among many, many others. Not all of this coverage was serious -- the Pavlok is one of those gimmicky, ridiculous tech ideas that just makes for good reading (or watching) -- but all of it is displayed like a badge of honor on the company's campaign page.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  6. What's In A Name: Sometimes you've got to call in the name whisperer

    Molly Davis has a unique job. As a communications strategist for MetaDesign -- a global design firm with a base in San Francisco which specializes in reshaping corporate identities and creating new "brand worlds" -- part of her dominion is helping lost companies refocus in their quest for the perfect name. When I reached her to talk, she was currently helping four companies on this journey. As she explained to me, it's a visual, as well as a written process, spurring the creative process by creating boundaries, examining meaning and trying to tell a long story in one word.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  7. I turned my apartment into a smart home... and all I got was bored

    After a week of dabbling with making my home smarter, I came to the conclusion that maybe my home was smart enough already... you know, with two living humans in it with full sensory perception, capable of operating all of its devices seamlessly.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  8. What's In A Name: "Semantic satiation" and the art of choosing a perfect company name

    It’s a slightly unusual feeling that we’ve all been struck with. We say some common everyday word one too many times and it suddenly loses all meaning. It just feels peculiar, like gibberish almost. (Tennis. Te-nnis! TENNIS. Ten-nis?) The phenomenon is so commonplace that it has inspired a gag on the most mainstream of mainstream sitcoms, like Friends and How I Met Your Mother.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

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