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Jeremy Liew

Jeremy Liew is a partner at Lightspeed Venture Partners. He invests primarily in the Internet and mobile sectors, and his investments include Snapchat, Whisper, Living Social, Playdom, Flixster, Kixeye, Zest Finance, The Honest Company, Bonobos and others. You can follow him on twitter (@jeremysliew) or on his blog.
  1. Smartphones are making shopping more fun

    In 2010, I wrote that one of the trends I expected in 2011 was that ecommerce companies were making shopping fun. The first generation of these ecommerce businesses, from Blue Nile* to Amazon, treated shopping as a search-driven process. They regarded their mission as trying to help you get through your shopping chores in the easiest possible way, whether it was to buy an engagement ring or a summer beach read. [Disclosure: Blue Nile, and others that appear with an asterisk, are Lightspeed Portfolio companies.]

    By Jeremy Liew , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Celebrities Will Drive the Next Wave of Ecommerce Startups

    In my last guest post I explored why ecommerce startups come in waves, and looked at three separate periods when large numbers of ecommerce startups got to scale. In each era, a new scalable and inefficient customer acquisition channel emerged, spawning the growth of each wave of new ecommerce startups. But once service providers emerge to make the channel efficient, the window closed for new startups.

    By Jeremy Liew , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Why Do Ecommerce Startups Come in Waves?

    It may seem daunting to think about starting a company like Amazon, Zappos, or Shoedazzle* from scratch. But at its core, ecommerce is a simple business. If Lifetime Value (LTV) > Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC), then you have a business. If not, you don't. Simple! Calculating lifetime value properly can take a bit of work. It is a function of purchase rates, average order size and contribution margin.

    By Jeremy Liew , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Why Does Disruption in Financial Services Come from Below?

    I recently did a guest post on PandoDaily about how big data and machine learning is creating disruptive financial services companies. Although there are some notable exception, it is interesting to note that most of these companies are playing in the bottom end of the market.

    By Jeremy Liew , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Big Data + Machine Learning = Scared banks.

    The WSJ notes how tech start-ups are taking on banks. Some companies are even targeting niches like lending money for in vitro fertilization.

    By Jeremy Liew , written on

    From the News desk