Pando

Kevin Kelleher

  1. Consider Myspace: What a comeback could look like

    The Web does not love second acts. Inexperienced startups with a crazy idea can become overnight stars, but companies that found and then lost success are simply written off as irrelevant. Entrepreneurs can see their credentials strengthened by noble failures, but once a brand is labeled a failure, it's all but over. There have only been two successful Web turnarounds so far, and they both took several years to accomplish.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Google Glass, big data and the digital self

    As Google Glass moves from in-house project to consumer product, it's generating a great deal of buzz. Ever since Google uploaded its How It Feels video showing the glasses in action, the devices have been the subject of news stories, blog ruminations and SXSW sightings.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Yelp's good stock day may be a bad sign

    You know things aren't going a company's way when a good day in the stock market is driven by little more than speculation. So it is with Yelp, which saw its stock rally 7 percent Friday to its highest level in more than four months because... well, it's not really clear why.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  4. What does it take to turn around a Web company? A look inside the only two we've ever seen

    Every time a has-been startup like Myspace or Digg or a big public company like Yahoo or AOL attempts a Web turnaround, the tech media is quick to remind them that Web turnarounds never work.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  5. The defenestration of Andrew Mason

    Andrew Mason has his own kind of panache. Not the epic, Steve Jobs panache. Or the eclectic, Barry Diller panache. Or even the oafish, Steve Ballmer panache. But as a CEO of one of the fastest-growing startups in history, he had the small-scale, misfit quirkiness of an indie movie. Panache-ette.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  6. There's messy. Then there's Groupon messy.

    There's no way around it. From an investor standpoint, the financial performance Groupon delivered in its most recent earnings report is a disaster. But Groupon is keeping its chin up, presenting a game face to investors as if to say: Hey, growth in our market can get messy. Like, you know, the way fast-growing startups can be messy.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Facebook won't die. And it won't own the Web. It'll just be... mediocre

    The good news about Facebook is that it is, once again, destined for great things. Which is unfortunate. Because the bad news about Facebook is that it's dying.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Why I'm rooting for Michael Dell

    Michael Dell has done it! Defying skeptics, he arranged a deal for Dell Inc. to go private, making the bold moves necessary to return the company he founded to its former glory. Or as close as it can get.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  1. Go to page 1.
  2. Go to page 2.
  3. Go to page 27.
  4. Go to page 28.
  5. Go to page 29.
  6. Go to page 31.
  7. Go to page 32.