Pando

Kevin Kelleher

  1. Hold the conspiracy theories: The real reason why Apple is slumping

    For a company at the peak of its game, Apple sure had a dismal week. The stock slumped 9 percent without any negative news, and in the midst of what could be its strongest quarter ever.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Google Fiber, you had our curiosity. Now you have our attention

    Under Larry Page, Google has developed a dive-first-learn-to-swim-later strategy, a willingness to embrace more risk than most companies making $40 billion a year in revenue would sensibly stomach. There was the push to design Google's empire of features around Google+, when most of its ad dollars were still tied to search. Then there was the $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobiliy, when it wasn't clear why Google needed to manufacture phones. (It still isn't.)

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  3. From MySpace to the Daily: The real tragedy in News Corp.'s digital experiments

    Give News Corp. credit for one thing: The company may have stumbled with the Daily, but it knows how to get people talking about how digital news should work.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  4. The clouds still hanging over Facebook

    The stock market is a fickle beast. Although it's been shown time and again to be a questionable measure of a company's worth, there's still this idea out there that a company is only as good as its stock price performance. Look at Facebook. In the past six months or so, it's gone from a new tech giant with a twelve-figure valuation to one of the worst IPOs in memory.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Schmidt-ing on founder-CEOs: Is anyone safe?

    This is just not Andrew Mason's year. The man who led Groupon while it was one of the fastest growing companies in history has watched his stock lose seven-eighths of its value. Now, according to AllThingsD, the board is thinking of bringing in a more experienced hand to manage Groupon – an Eric Schmidt type of leader. With Mason's blessing, of course. In other words, Mason is going to get Schmidt-ed on.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  6. How the Autonomy scandal could derail HP's turnaround

    According to the dictates of crisis management, a company that discovers a harmful impropriety should make a clean breast of it right away. Then, after the inevitable storm, it can move on. And that must have been the narrative HP was crafting when it announced a $5 billion writedown yesterday related to what it called serious accounting improprieties.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  7. HP, Autonomy, and the perils of spinning facts

    To hear Mike Lynch tell it, he's not above stretching the truth. In 2010, back when he was CEO of the UK software firm Autonomy (and a year before Hewlett-Packard regrettably paid $11.4 billion for it), he recounted an early and formative meeting with a potential investor -- a cigar-chomping billionaire too dim to understand the complex math driving Autonomy's data-management software.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Microsoft and Apple clean house, but what if they need the mess?

    Despite their distinct histories and their storied rivalry, Apple and Microsoft have a lot in common these days. Both have shaped, in their own ways, personal computing as we know it today. Both see their futures in a mix of operating software, device manufacturing, and cloud-based services.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

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