Pando

Kevin Kelleher

  1. AOL has been down so long, it's starting to look like up

    Good news! For the first time in seven years, AOL's revenue didn't shrink! The company said this morning that it brought in $532 million in revenue last quarter, flat with the same quarter one year ago. Which is to say AOL still hasn't seen any growth since 2005. Okay... maybe it's not such great news after all.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Happy anniversary, Groupon! Or, how to spot a bad IPO

    A year ago, Groupon staged an initial public offering that was as anticipated as it was controversial. As I look back, the one thing that stands out in my memory has nothing to do with the company's finances or its stock. It's this video of Bloomberg's Emily Chang asking Groupon's insiders for an interview outside the Nasdaq Market.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  3. How ecosystems became the new walled gardens

    Back in the 1990s, when nearly every newspaper story about the World Wide Web seemed to include some mention of the Wild West, offering Internet newbies a safe environment was a sound business model. In 1999, America Online made $4.8 billion in revenue by offering a reliable Internet connection and a walled garden of content. But soon enough the Web outside AOL's walls became more secure (and much more compelling), and people found its walled garden to be less of a fortress and more of a prison.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Reed Hastings, meet Carl Icahn. And good luck.

    Carl Icahn says he's been trying to reach Netflix CEO Reed Hastings on the phone, but it doesn't sound like Hastings has been taking the call. “Of course, I don't know if anyone will listen to me,” Icahn said in an interview with Bloomberg Wednesday. “Maybe eventually.”

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Netflix must ponder its endgame strategy

    Was it really only 15 months ago when everyone loved Netflix? The stock had risen nearly eightfold during a two-year rally, CEO Reed Hastings was hailed as a game changer and was asked for the secrets of his success, and Netflix was on track to kill off cable and rule the new world of online video.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Marissa Mayer and the art of the earnings call

    Conference calls discussing corporate earnings are often like political debates: An hour or so of jargon as dry as dirt. But much like the this year's presidential debates, Yahoo's earnings call Monday promised to be worth tuning into, if for no other reason that this was Marissa Mayer's first and best chance to make her case for reviving the company. And like the debates so far, Mayer did not disappoint.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Now Google must face its own moment of crisis

    This, apparently, is how a crisis begins for Web giants these days: It starts with a simple glitch – a computerized trading platform being overwhelmed, say, or a human being issuing a press release hours too early. That halts trading in the stock for hours, while a sense of panic in the markets begins to simmer. When the stock resumes trading, it's much, much cheaper. The online conversation focuses on what went wrong. And suddenly the company finds itself on the defensive.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Google: The phoenix that rose out of Facebook's botched IPO

    The lifespan of tech stars seems to be growing shorter and shorter. It used to be that companies like Intel and Microsoft would rule industries for a decade or more before new technologies would turn them into also-rans. But it was less than a decade after Google was founded and only three years after it went public that some people were predicting Facebook would kick its search-engine butt.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

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