Pando

Kevin Kelleher

  1. The Unpivotable Hewlett-Packard

    Pivots are the stuff of startup legends. YouTube's first version was a dating site called Tune in-Hook Up. Groupon grew out of a "social action platform" named The Point. The genesis of PayPal was a forgotten cryptography company called Confinity. Facemash preceded Facebook. Odeo begat Twttr. And on and on...

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  2. How Amazon Beat the Odds in the Tablet Economy

    Whether you own one or not, you have to respect the Kindle. In the age of digital Darwinism -- where perfectly good products and companies were brutally rendered extinct by superior species – the Kindle was the little e-reader that could, not only thriving in the age of tablets but even, in time, evolving into a multimedia device that took a bite of the market share for tablets.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  3. What Happens If Smartphones Become Commodities?

    Remember Antennagate? Back in the summer of 2010, the brouhaha over reception glitches in the iPhone 4 dominated tech headlines for weeks and led to a class-action lawsuit and a $15 per user settlement. In retrospect, the controversy seems meaningless, which is why I thought of it amid the current flap over Apple Maps.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Why Yahoo Is Screwed after the Alibaba Deal

    It's funny how money can somehow seem to start vanishing even before you can finish counting it all. Just ask Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Facebook's Growing Silent-Majority Problem

    For all its talk about bringing people together online, Facebook has been a pretty divisive company. There have always been two vocal camps: One took to the the social network, sharing their quotidian lives in piecemeal updates and shifting a good portion of their social interactions onto Facebook's sprawling social graph. The other took the opposite direction, avoiding the site entirely, or canceling their accounts, or griping as they came to endure Facebook as a necessary evil of being online.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Tim Cook's Apple: A Perfectly Ordinary Company

    No question about it: This is a great time for Apple. The stock is up 63 percent so far this year – triple the Nasdaq's rise - and several analysts expect it to top $1,000 a share by next year. By one count, the iPad commands a 70 percent share of the tablet market, and the iPhone 5, widely expected to be unveiled Wednesday, could sell 170 million units over the coming year.

    By Kevin Kelleher , written on

    From the News desk

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