Pando

Mark Ames

  1. "The poor, the young, the black and the stupid": Inside Big Tobacco's plans to kill a billion people

    The most outrageous business conspiracy in history and what today's tech giants have learned from it.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the Murder desk

  2. A brief history of American gun nuts

    Neither Obama nor the other gun restrictions advocates grasp what they’re really dealing with.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the Second Amendment desk

  3. The group that inspired Dylann Roof's massacre also took credit for the Confederate flag flying in SC

    "Since that time, other Southern heritage groups have become involved in defending the flag, though the CofCC continues to play a leading role in its defense."

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the Confederacy desk

  4. The ACLU helped the government harass Tor's Jacob Appelbaum

    This seems like a story of evil intrusive government-vs.-good civil libertarian activist. The truth is far more muddled and depressing.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the Legal Affairs desk

  5. Pierre Omidyar's corporate spying scandal buried for good as eBay sells Craigslist stake

    It didn’t get much attention, but eBay just quietly unloaded its 28.4 percent stake in Craigslist, putting to rest one of the most sordid episodes in Silicon Valley, in which eBay executives — including First Look Media publisher Pierre Omidyar and HP chief Meg Whitman — were directly implicated in corporate spying, stealing secrets, and exploiting Craigslist’s anti-capitalist idealism.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Uber's drivers are employees, not "contractors": California labor commission ruling

    Uber’s business model—skim profits off drivers, while avoiding the expenses that come with hiring drivers as employees—just suffered a major blow: the California labor commission has just ruled that Uber’s drivers are, in fact, employees, not contractors. Uber, which has seen its valuation soar to over $50 billion, can no longer claim that it is just a nifty little app that happens to pair up micro-entrepreneurial drivers and consumers, thereby avoiding the expenses and laws that other transportation and logistics companies have to bear.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Silicon Valley and the Ingestible Bilderberg ID Chips

    —DailyPaul.com, June 11, 2012 If someone says “Bilderberg Group” with a straight face, most respectable folks reach for their canister of Bear Mace spray—only to check themselves because odds are, if someone is talking “Bilderberg” they’re probably packing something far more lethal than pepper fog.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Seymour Hersh and the dangers of corporate muckraking

    Ida Tarbell dug deep into Rockefeller’s Standard Oil empire and all the ways it exercised a kind of private government tyranny over huge swathes of public life; Tarbell’s work directly influenced the antitrust breakup of Standard Oil in 1911. Upton Sinclair exposed brutality in the meatpacking industry — on its workers, the slaughtered animals, and the diseased, rat-infested meats that eventually wound up in consumers’ homes — leading to the Meat Inspection Act and the Food and Drug Administration. Other muckraking exposés led to state-level child labor and workers’ comp laws, the progressive income tax amendment, and laws placing vast expanses of land and forests under federal protection from rapacious robber barons.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

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