Pando

Mark Ames

  1. Meet the man Silicon Valley's CEOs turn to when they want to justify screwing workers

    Late last month, I revealed the contents of court documents which show the illegal fixing of salaries by some of Silicon Valley’s largest companies, and most respected CEOs. Such brazen, and meticulously documented, anti-competitive behavior by the likes of Steve Jobs and Eric Schmidt was hard to believe, let alone justify.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  2. The first congressman to battle the NSA is dead. No-one noticed, no-one cares.

    “Pike will pay for this, you wait and see—we’ll destroy him for this.” —Mitchell Rogovin, CIA special counsel, 1976 Last month, former Congressman Otis Pike died, and no one seemed to notice or care. That’s scary, because Pike led the House’s most intensive and threatening hearings into US intelligence community abuses, far more radical and revealing than the better-known Church Committee’s Senate hearings that took place at the same time. That Pike could die today in total obscurity, during the peak of the Snowden NSA scandal, is, as they say, a “teachable moment” —one probably not lost on today’s already spineless political class.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  3. The Techtopus: How Silicon Valley's most celebrated CEOs conspired to drive down 100,000 tech engineers' wages

    In early 2005, as demand for Silicon Valley engineers began booming, Apple's Steve Jobs sealed a secret and illegal pact with Google's Eric Schmidt to artificially push their workers wages lower by agreeing not to recruit each other's employees, sharing wage scale information, and punishing violators. On February 27, 2005, Bill Campbell, a member of Apple's board of directors and senior advisor to Google, emailed Jobs to confirm that Eric Schmidt "got directly involved and firmly stopped all efforts to recruit anyone from Apple."

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Edward Snowden demands press freedom (for journalists who don't live or work in Russia)

    "Russia...[has] my gratitude and respect for being the first to stand against human rights violations carried out by the powerful rather than the powerless. By refusing to compromise their principles in the face of intimidation, [Russia has] earned the respect of the world." — Edward Snowden Earlier this week, the Freedom of the Press Foundation (FPF) announced that it had named NSA whistleblower-defector Edward Snowden, currently hiding out in Russia under Kremlin protection, to its board of directors.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Snowden's biggest revelation: We don't know what power is anymore, nor do we care

    It’s been a busy end of 2013 for the Snowden/NSA story: a pair of conflicting judicial rulings on the legality or illegality of the NSA’s phone surveillance program; an Obama-appointed panel recommending mild NSA reforms, including scaling back the NSA’s phone metadata vacuuming program; a rare and remarkably unrevealing interview with Snowden in the Washington Post, in which Snowden declared "Mission Accomplished"; followed up by a rather sad "Snowden Xmas Message" aired on Britain’s Channel 4; and more sensational revelations about the NSA spying on our closest allies, published last Friday in the New York Times, Guardian, and Der Spiegel.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Team Omidyar, World Police: eBay puts user data on a "silver platter" for law enforcement

    "We don't believe the NSA has come near our data… We have a tremendous amount of thought and procedures and security around customer data." - Devin Wenig, president, eBay Marketplace

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Keeping Secrets: Pierre Omidyar, Glenn Greenwald and the privatization of Snowden's leaks

    Who “owns” the NSA secrets leaked by Edward Snowden to reporters Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras?

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

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