Pando

Mark Ames

  1. Baltimore & The Walking Dead

    Two decades ago, after Los Angeles exploded in the worst American riots of the 20th century against years of police brutality against minorities, the political establishment responded by doubling down and ramping up all the wrong ideas that are blowing back today in places like Baltimore and Ferguson. President Bush blamed the LA riots on liberal anti-poverty programs from the 1960s and 1970s, which he claimed destroyed black families and a sense of responsibility in their communities. Candidate Bill Clinton talked “tough on crime” while squirting a few crocodile tears in public, all part of his New Democrat program. Libertarian Party nominee for president Andre Marrou vowed he would “send in troops right away” as his solution to the Los Angeles riots and grievances. Meanwhile, “principled” libertarian Ron Paul wrote in his newsletter after the riots that he taught everyone in his family, including his son Rand Paul, to use a gun because “the animals are coming.”

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  2. The Apologiator: President Obama takes responsibility, again. And again. And again...

    Obama did it again: After news broke that his drone assassins killed two Al Qaeda hostages in Pakistan, including American aid worker Warren Weinstein, the president took “full responsibility” and offered his “deepest apologies.”

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  3. eBay is first Valley giant to comply with Kremlin server law

    The Kremlin has been tightening the screws on Russia’s once-anarchic Internet space, and Pierre Omidyar’s eBay has reportedly become the first Silicon Valley company to step forward and agree to the Kremlin’s top demand: storing Russian users’ data on servers in Russian territory, where it can be more easily accessed by the state security services.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Pressure grows on Apple to address hiring discrimination

    Previously, we reported on the scandal around Apple's hiring ban on felons and pending-felons (innocent under the law) from working construction on its new $5 billion Cupertino campus. Now more civil rights groups are publicly calling on Apple to take the lead in ending hiring discrimination policies that target Americans with criminal records.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  5. How Silicon Valley almost joined the Confederacy... and the Rand Paul speechwriter who probably wishes it had

    Yesterday was the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Lincoln by Confederate thespian John Wilkes Booth. The New York Times and AP have posted their original stories on the assassination — the Times' even features a digital replica of how the original article and newspaper looked to readers 150 years ago.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Apple wage fixing plaintiff accuses execs of hypocrisy over discriminatory labor policy

    Critics — including Pando — have used various words to describe Apple's now-overturned ban of employing accused felons from construction work on their new campus. Words like discriminatory and illegal.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Former NAACP head calls on Apple to do more than just rescind discriminatory hiring policy

    Last week, we reported on Apple's discriminatory ban on hiring construction workers with felony convictions and those with pending felony cases from working on its new $5 billion "space ship" office complex in Cupertino. Our reporting focused not only on the immorality of such a discriminatory ban against those still innocent under the law, and those who already served their time — but on how Apple's policy was likely illegal too, in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. (See here, here, here and here.) By the end of last week, Apple backed down and announced it had rescinded its discriminatory hiring policy.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Facebook: No, we don't have the same discriminatory labor policy as Apple

    Over the weekend I wrote about Apple's reported policy of banning not just convicted felons but also those charged but not convicted of felonies from doing construction work on their new campus.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

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