Pando

Adam L. Penenberg

  1. GM's hit and run: How a lawyer, mechanic, and engineer blew open the worst auto scandal in history

    As the sun was setting on a stormy Georgia day, Brooke Melton was 30 miles outside of Atlanta in her Chevy Cobalt. It was March 10, 2010, her birthday, and the 29-year-old pediatric nurse was on her way to her boyfriend’s to celebrate.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Dancing Giants: Samsung's Open Innovation Center

    Marc Shedroff, Vice-President of Samsung's Open Innovation Center

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Dancing Giants: Why large companies should embrace the minimum viable product

    There are lean startups, then there are startups that exist to help large and small companies act more like startups -- like 3Pillar Global. Based in Fairfax, VA, the company sells software to help businesses create their own software and "quickly turn ideas into value" through the entire development development lifecycle. As such, its founder and CEO, David DeWolf, is a big fan of the minimum viable product (MVP).

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Dancing Giants: At Intuit, ideas for new products can come from anywhere

    If you were asked to compile a list of the most innovative corporations, it might not occur to you to include a tax, accounting, and finance software provider. But few companies have embraced the art of the startup within a large organization better than Intuit. The makers of TurboTax and QuickBooks have created a work environment that rewards employees for thinking and acting like entrepreneurs. What's more, it has been tapping the collective wisdom of the crowd for insights and ideas that have led to new and successful products.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Dancing Giants: How a huge postal goods manufacturer uses lean startup methodology to survive

    It’s hard to imagine a corporation more vulnerable to the ravages of Schumpter’s creative destruction than a manufacturer of postal meters and scales, mail sorters, and automated letter opening machines for businesses and post offices around the world. But that’s precisely what Neopost, a French corporation with 6,000 employees and a $2.76 billion market cap, confronts.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Dancing Giants: Startup guru Steve Blank bashes big companies that stack the deck

    Steve Blank is a kind of folk hero in startup circles. A successful entrepreneur, Blank, though his writings and Lean LaunchPad seminars at Stanford and online -- more than 150,000 students have taken it -- has become kind of a startup guru whose aim is to take the guesswork out of product development. Most companies don’t fail because they couldn’t attract a management team or gin up a product, he says. They fail because they didn’t create a product that will sell. Both he and Eric Ries, a former student, have become synonymous with the lean startup methodology that provides a systematic approach to creating startups.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Dancing Giants: How a rusting giant can act more like a startup

    Trevor Owens, founder of Javelin (formerly Lean Startup Machine), has a bleak-- but simple -- prescription for big companies: Act more like a startup or enjoy a long slide into irrelevance and creative destruction.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Dancing Giants: Can big companies still innovate?

    You hear it all the time. Big companies can't innovate. It's become a meme, conventional wisdom, accepted as fact. Massive corporations have massive bureaucracies. They're sclerotic, afraid of cannibalizing core businesses, unable to adapt quickly to new markets or changes in markets they once owned.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

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