Pando

Adam L. Penenberg

  1. Decoding Nakamoto: Language analysis pokes more holes in Newsweek's bitcoin story

    Give five writing samples to the right person with the right tools, and he might be able to tell you who wrote each. Like fingerprints and voices, the way we write not only says a lot about us, it can give us away if we wish to remain anonymous. With the right questions, you can determine a person's dialect, and place where he was raised within a few miles -- as The New York Times showed with its ingenious Dialect Quiz. It's a linguistic science called "stylometry," which is a highfalutin way of referring to textual analysis.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  2. After the Mt. Gox fiasco, calls for regulating bitcoin

    For hundreds of years, bank failures were common. In 1792, the United States had its first financial crisis, when an expansion of credit brought rampant speculation. Boom meet bust, and when speculators defaulted on loans, prices fell and customers raced to withdraw their money from banks teetering on the edge.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Arab Bank lawyers claim Pando story poisons jury pool; judge disagrees

    Earlier this week I published an in-depth feature story on Arab Bank and a lawsuit that seeks to hold it responsible for facilitating massive amounts of terror financing. A few days after "Follow the Money: Exposing the secret U.S. operations that help fund suicide bombers" went online, lawyers representing Arab Bank filed a complaint with the court, claiming that two of the attorneys I quote in the story had violated Rules of Professional Conduct in an attempt to "taint the jury pool." They sought remedies that could include "a change of venue, trial postponement," as well as "emphatic warnings to the press and parties.”

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Follow the blood money: Exposing the secret US banking operations that help fund suicide bombers

    Editor's note: This story by Adam Penenberg was first published on Pando in 2014. In March 2015 it was nominated for a Deadline Club award.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  5. The Steve Jobs stamp: Commemorating the man who helped destroy the post office

    The Washington Post reports that Steve Jobs will be joining Dora the Explorer, Charlton Heston, Run DMC, John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Harvey Milk, and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer on future commemorative postage stamps. The stamp is being designed and scheduled for release in 2015.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  6. The greatest pizza box known to man (and it's patented)

    In the classic cyberpunk novel, Snow Crash, author Neal Stephenson envisions a future when America does only four things well: movies, music, software, and high-speed pizza delivery. Unlike the first three, which experience a constant state of disruption, pizza has resisted change. It's prepared and delivered pretty much like it was 40 years ago. You call (maybe order online), give your address and ask for extra cheese, pepperoni, maybe some mushrooms, and about 30 minutes later some shlub drives, pedals or walks the steaming pie to your door. After you chow down on the pizza you chuck the box in the recycling.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Patents show that Apple has been trying to break into your car for years

    Rumors abound that Apple has explored the idea of buying Tesla. Naturally the article that started this, published in the San Francisco Chronicle over the weekend, doesn't come out and say this. It just strongly implied it by reporting that Adrian Perica, Apple's mergers and acquisitions czar, who has been on a buying spree over the past 18 months, "met with Tesla CEO Elon Musk in Cupertino last spring around the same time analysts suggested Apple acquire the electric car giant."

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Why stop at 56 gender options? Facebook should add nuance to relationships, too

    For those who feel that identifying yourself as either male or female is too limiting, Facebook now claims to offer 56 new gender options. In addition to such binary categories as male and female, you can be "agender," "androgyne," "androgynous," "Cis," "gender fluid," "intersex," "two-spirit," "non-binary" -- which sounds like something a Facebook coder might choose -- a series of variations on "transgender," and many more. (Click here for a full list.)

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

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