Pando

Adam L. Penenberg

  1. Forget Google Glass: If Virgin wants "flying to be a pleasure" it should change how it treats passengers

    Virgin Atlantic concierges in the Upper Class lounge at London's Heathrow Airport are testing out Google Glass for checking in upper crust passengers. I can just imagine Virgin staff pirouetting their heads like dancers in an avant-garde troupe, whispering sweet nothings to themselves while watching YouTube videos of cats.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Marc Andreessen tweets an astute analysis of the news business

    Marc Andreessen signed up for Twitter six and a half years ago, didn't post a tweet for four years, and two and a half years ago tweeted once more. [Disclosure: Marc Andreessen is an investor in Pando.] It then took years for him to return to Twitter (982 days to be exact) but following a New Year's resolution -- he timed his first tweet to post at midnight -- he sure has been making up for lost time. In fact, lately he has been on a tear. Forbes even lauded him for using Twitter like a real human being.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  3. "Selfie" and the worst TV show social media can spawn

    They say we are in a second, or even third Golden Age of Television, when TV has eclipsed movies -- Breaking Bad, Mad Men, Downton Abbey, and before them The Sopranos and The Wire -- with the rise of cable TV and the explosion in television channels resulting in unprecedented opportunity for writers and producers to push boundaries and experiment.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  4. GoldieBlox Super Bowl ad undermines its Beastie Boys legal position

    Oh, look. Goldieblox, the toy company that seeks "to inspire the next generation of female engineers," had a new commercial run during the Super Bowl.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Inside the mind of Jason Calacanis

    Not long after Jason Calacanis raised $20 million in venture capital for Mahalo, his startup that was initially predicated on human-powered search, I flew to Los Angeles to profile him for a magazine. I'm a native New Yorker who earlier in life had bicycled halfway around the world and hitchhiked the rest. When I finally settled in Manhattan's East Village in my late 20s, I didn't have much need for a car, which meant I didn't feel compelled to learn how to drive. Shortly before landing at LAX, though, I finally went through the machinations to receiving my license.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Five views of the future from the past

    Nothing dates a movie, book, or article quite like predictions of the future. The original "Star Trek," for instance, just had to have been shot in the mid to late 1960s. It rode on the coattails of NASA's all out blitz to get to the moon and drew on the Cold War for cultural relevance. The Federation was the US, the Klingons were Russians, the Romulans Chinese. Hot food came out of a replicator, or as we call them: vending machines. They had communicators. We have smartphones. And let's not forget those 1960s haircuts.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Why Gawker will beat Quentin Tarantino over his leaked script

    If I were John Cook, editor of the famously dyspeptic Gawker, I would be irritated -- and not just because some thoughtless oaf didn't shovel his sidewalk after a snow storm, which once inspired Cook to post a raucously entertaining rant. Here you have a media site being sued by a Hollywood celebrity, and some outlets reporting on it are getting their facts wrong and not even bothering to correct their articles after the fact. It's funny, too, because Gawker is, well, Gawker, and you'd better be prepared to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous verbal abuse if you screw up the story.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  8. No second chance for Stephen Glass: The long, strange downfall of a journalistic wunderkind

    The California Supreme Court has denied disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass a license to practice law.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

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