Pando

Peter Levine

Peter Levine, general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, has been a lecturer at both MIT and Stanford business schools and was CEO of Xensource. Prior to Xensource, Peter was EVP of Strategic and Platform Operations at Veritas Software, where he helped grow the organization from no revenue to more than $1.5 billion, and from 20 employees to over 6,000. He blogs at http://peter.a16z.com .
  1. What Now: Turning Vision Into Execution

    You’ve been CEO of SpiderNet for the past two years and have embraced a very trusting culture among your team. For the most part, you and your team discuss future vision and the team goes off and executes against that vision. You’ve never needed to really manage objectives or goals, simply because the team has generally delivered on the stated direction.

    By Peter Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  2. What Now: Board Meeting or Waste of Time?

    SpiderNet has been around for a few years and you’ve held many board meetings over this time period. But the board meetings have become routine reporting events, and you are often forced to spend additional time with each board member after a board meeting to “tell the real story." You are starting to feel that your board meetings are pretty much bullshit and a waste of time.

    By Peter Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  3. What Now: Deal or No Deal?

    In addition to the Freemium and upsell model that SpiderNet has implemented, you have also decided to pursue a strategic partnering/OEM model. You’ve brought on a world-class Business Development executive with the objective of getting major ecosystem players to adopt your free, base software into their distribution and enable them to upsell above that base. The model will enable additional deployments of your free software, providing additional opportunity to monetize the user base.

    By Peter Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  4. What Now: Scaling the Sales Organization

    In last week’s decision, the management at SpiderNet decided to pursue a freemium model, where the company would give away a free product and then upsell a $99 added value feature set. As part of this go-to-market model, SpiderNet must now decide on how to allocate and budget for sales resources.

    By Peter Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  5. What Now: Freemium or Paid?

    Your company SpiderNet is in the final stages of defining the go-to-market model and pricing for the product. The company has spent a great deal of time debating the benefits of doing a freemium model versus paid. The product has the capability to be split along a free/paid feature set, but there are differing opinions in the company on what to do.

    By Peter Levine , written on

    From the News desk