Pando

Richard Nieva

  1. Ride and car-sharing companies try to woo regulators by touting personal safety

    Sharing economy companies are no strangers to regulatory troubles. There’s a long laundry list of examples of City Hall trying to put the clamp on these companies, from Airbnb’s legality being questioned in New York to RelayRides being banned in New York State to FlightCar being sued by the city of San Francisco.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  2. FlightCar illustrates the promise and pain of the sharing economy

    FlightCar is a company of the moment. And by that, I mean it in the way that people say certain works of literature are “of their moment,” and that they couldn’t exist in any other time in history. If Airbnb was the seminal company that ushered the sharing economy into the mainstream, and Uber put it on wheels, and RelayRides, in its similar quest to make use of idle assets, combined the two – all in a clusterfuck of litigation, regulation, and insurance woes – then FlightCar is where they all converge.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  3. The Breaking News Network thinks it can fix hyperlocal journalism with lots and lots of Twitter feeds

    Hyperlocal news is a cruel sector that has already taken down a number of contenders, famously including ones with large corporate balance sheets. So when one company tries to do it on a thrift store budget, it’s audacious and hopeless, right?

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Not a shocker: All VCs are different. Pitch accordingly

    Last night, at the Churchill Club’s annual VC roundtable in Mountain View, CA, venture capitalists from firms like Greylock Partners, Khosla Ventures, and New Enterprise Associates told an audience how to best pitch them.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  5. A look at Zynga's attempt to enter the real money gaming market in Nevada

    This week, Zynga dove headfirst into turnaround mode. The company laid off 18 percent of its staff and shuttered offices in New York (where all of OMGPOP worked), Los Angeles, and Dallas. In a blog post announcing the job cuts, CEO Mark Pincus cited the need to focus more on mobile gaming as the reason for the bloodletting. But at the company’s annual shareholder meeting on Tuesday, one shareholder in attendance said the meeting was lopsidedly focused on real money gaming.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Any.do announces Cal, a proudly not-so-smart calendar app

    In an age of “smart” everything – phone, TV, scale, watch, fridge – here’s an idea that’s refreshingly contrarian: build an app that’s not so smart. Not dumb. Just one that doesn’t try to be smart enough to do everything for a user.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  7. At Zynga's shareholder meeting, a heavy focus on real money gaming

    Zynga held its annual shareholder meeting today at a hotel in downtown San Francisco. The gathering comes one day after the social gaming company laid off 520 employees -- about 18 percent of its workforce -- to focus on mobile gaming, according to a blog post by CEO Mark Pincus. The company also shuttered offices in New York, Los Angeles, and Dallas. I tried to attend the meeting, though reps from Zynga would not allow me into the room.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Xyo and the foundation for a predictive app discovery engine

    Here is your meta moment for the day: Predictive apps, like Google Now, Grokr and Tempo, are all the rage. But what if there were a predictive service to help you discover those predictive apps?

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

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